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Denmark Culture

The Danes, who have struggled to integrate non-Western families, are getting tough: From age 1, immigrant children will receive mandatory instruction in “Danish culture.”
www.nytimes.com | 7/2/18

Despite being two of the longest running institutions in cinema, the Oscars and Cannes have not always been the best of bedfellows. Only one film, 1955’s “Marty,” has won both the Palme D’Or and Best Picture. But many more films that have played on the croisette at Cannes have been nominated or won other big prizes from the Academy. These are the 16 films that both won the Palme D’Or and won an additional Oscar.

“Marty” (1955)

In the first year that Cannes started calling their top prize the Palme D’Or, the Delbert Mann drama and romance based on the Paddy Chayefsky teleplay won four Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Writing and Best Actor for Ernest Borgnine.

“The Silent World” (1956)

Jacques-Yves Cousteau’s pioneering, underwater nature documentary beat out films from Satyajit Ray, Alfred Hitchcock, Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa and more to win the Palme, and it also took home the Best Documentary Oscar.

“Black Orpheus” (1959)

Marcel Camus’s dreamy, contemporary take on the Orpheus and Eurydice Greek myth won the Palme and the Best Foreign Language Oscar.

“La Dolce Vita” (1960)

Federico Fellini’s sensuous reverie of a film “La Dolce Vita” managed Oscar nods for Best Director and Screenplay, but only won for Best Costume Design.

“A Man and a Woman” (1966)

The Academy rewarded this French New Wave romance starring Anouk Aimee and Jean-Louis Trintignant with two Oscars, one for its screenplay and another for Best Foreign Language Film.

“MASH” (1970)

It’s surprising to see Cannes anoint a film as irreverent as Robert Altman’s screwball war satire “MASH,” but though the Oscars nominated it for Best Picture, the award went to another war film, “Patton.” “MASH” did pick up a win for Altman’s ingenious ensemble screenplay.

“Apocalypse Now” (1979)

Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam war masterpiece was still a work-in-progress when it screened at Cannes, and it would split the Palme with “The Tin Drum” that same year. It was nominated for eight Oscars and won two, but lost Best Picture to “Kramer vs. Kramer.”

“The Tin Drum” (1979)

After splitting the Palme with “Apocalypse Now,” “The Tin Drum” won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar with ease.

“All That Jazz” (1980)

Weirdly, Bob Fosse’s musical was nominated alongside “Apocalypse Now” at the 1979 Oscars, opening in December of that year, but it won the 1980 Cannes after cleaning up four Oscars just a month earlier.

“Missing” (1982)

Jack Lemmon won Cannes’s Best Actor prize for Costa-Gavras’s political thriller in addition to “Missing” winning the Palme. And Lemmon and co-star Sissy Spacek each scored acting nominations in addition to the film being nominated for Best Picture, but it only won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

“The Mission” (1986)

Starring Robert de Niro and Jeremy Irons as Spanish Jesuits trying to save a native American tribe, Roland Joffe’s “The Mission” won the Palme and earned seven nominations but only one Oscar win for Best Cinematography.

“Pelle the Conqueror” (1987)

The legendary Max von Sydow plays a Swedish immigrant in Denmark in this Danish film that won the Palme, the Best Foreign Language Oscar and netted Sydow his first acting nomination.

“The Piano” (1993)

Holly Hunter won the Best Actress prize at both Cannes and the Oscars for Jane Campion’s drama that won the Palme D’Or and was nominated for eight Oscars in all.

“Pulp Fiction” (1994)

Much has been written about the bombshell Quentin Tarantino set off when “Pulp Fiction” debuted at Cannes and polarized audiences by winning the Palme, not to mention the cultural rift it created when it went head to head with “Forrest Gump” at the Oscars and lost.

“The Pianist” (2002)

Winning Best Director for Roman Polanski and Best Actor for Adrien Brody, “The Pianist” was a strong favorite to win Best Picture after winning the Palme, but it lost to the musical “Chicago.” Just don’t expect a repeat from Polanski anytime soon.

“Amour” (2012)

Michael Haneke had just won his second Palme D’Or for his sobering romance about old age “Amour,” and rightfully so. The film paired French New Wave legends Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva and scored five Oscar nominations in all, including Best Picture, but only came away with a win for Best Foreign Language Film.

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www.thewrap.com | 5/8/18
Filmmaker Lars von Trier remains his own worst enemy. That was one of the obvious takeaways from an engrossing but also slightly concerning new discussion with the polarizing director. In a rare interview given this month to the in-house TV channel of Denmark's arts platform The Louisiana Museum, a pale, hirsute and subdued von Trier discussed his on-going battle with addiction and his now infamous expulsion from Cannes in 2011. "I felt horrible during filming for this…
deadline.com | 4/24/18
Copenhagen hogs the spotlight, but for radical Danish architecture, cutting-edge food and plenty of hygge, head to Aarhus.
www.wsj.com | 12/7/17

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — The director of a Stockholm cultural center has been banned by the Swedish Academy, which awards the Nobel Literature Prize, from attending a Nobel banquet after several women made sexual misconduct allegations against the man.

Earlier this week, Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter published allegations from 18 women claiming to have been assaulted or raped by the man, who has not been named. He has denied wrongdoing to the paper.

The alleged assaults occurred between 1996 to 2017, according to the newspaper, one of Sweden's largest.

Journalists in Denmark have revealed that H&M are burning new clothes. Since 2013, 12 tonnes of clothing has been burned per year in Denmark alone.

You might remember that H&M has been heavily promoting its recycling scheme. Whenever Greenpeace campaigned on the need to limit their immense use of resources, H&M responded with grand promises that soon everything will be "kept in the loop" and that technical innovations will make their manufacturing chain more sustainable.

But can we still trust a company that publishes lengthy sustainability reports which fail to mention anything about burning tonnes of clothing? Any brand that spends millions promoting recycling campaigns has to stand up to scrutiny.

At our request, H&M has now finally admitted that this is not an isolated case, but the incineration of reject clothes is a common practice worldwide. They say that they only burn clothes that can’t be sold, gifted, or recycled - clothes that are unusable scrap due to production errors. They emphasise that it’s only a last resort: when the labels on jeans are contaminated with lead or when t-shirts are mouldy.

Shouldn’t any company that has committed to recycling find a way to remove contaminated labels from their jeans and recycle the rest? If they take the problem of dangerous chemicals seriously, they shouldn’t be releasing potentially harmful substances into the atmosphere.

Despite their talk, H&M and other textile companies are stubbornly continuing their operations in the same old wasteful way. It shows us how little they value their clothes.

Bestseller (the parent company of Vero Moda and Jack & Jones) burned even more clothing than H&M last year in Denmark, and luxury labels are known to destroy unsold clothes, to stop them reappearing on the second-hand market.

H&M has shown the world that damaged clothes don’t deserve to be fixed; that they should be thrown onto the flames because recycling would be too costly and time-consuming. If this is already too much effort, how is H&M’s highly anticipated closed loop recycling scheme ever going to work?

Every single t-shirt that they make pollutes the environment.  Perhaps H&M is just using the idea of recycling as an excuse to continue to produce disposable clothes without restraint.  

We need to break the cycle of overconsumption and end throw-away culture. Are you on board?  



The culture of Denmark has some general characteristics often associated with Danish society and everyday culture. Modesty, punctuality but above all equality are important aspects of the Danish way of life. Indeed, deliberate attempts to distinguish oneself from others may be viewed with hostility in line with Jante's Law, respected by some as an unofficial code of Scandinavian conduct. In Denmark, culture and the arts thrive as a result of the proportionately high amount of government funding they receive, much of which is administered by local authorities so as to involve citizens directly. Thanks to a system of grants, Danish artists are able to devote themselves to their work just as museums, theatres, and the film institute receive national support.


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