Français | English | Español | Português

Poland Culture

Ben Barenholtz, the producer-distributor who helped launch the careers of David Lynch and the Coen Brothers, died on Wednesday in Prague at the age of 83.

Barenholtz is credited with pioneering the concept of the “midnight movie” by screening subversive, future cult classics like John Waters’ “Pink Flamingos” and Alejandro Jodorowsky’s “El Topo,” the latter of which Barenholtz decided to screen at the (now defunct) Elgin Theater in New York City after attending the private screening of it at the Museum of Modern Art. That screening is seen as essential by film historians to helping the film find a wider audience and gain a legacy as one of Jodorowsky’s most famous works.

During World War II, Barenholtz escaped the Nazi concentration camps at the age of eight by living in the woods of Poland with 11 other escapees, losing his father during the war. Barenholtz kept his past a secret until 2010 when he revealed it in a series of blog posts.

Also Read: Billy Drago, Star of 'The Untouchables,' Dies at 73

As an adult, Barenholtz got his start in the film industry as a movie theater owner, opening The Elgin in 1968. The theater became a hotbed for New York’s cinema scene, screening classic films from Buster Keaton, experimental work from Andy Warhol and films from New Hollywood filmmakers like Martin Scorsese.

Barenholtz’s impact on film expanded when he entered into film distribution, starting labels like Libra Films and Circle Films. Through those companies, Barenholtz released the debut films from David Lynch and Joel & Ethan Coen, “Eraserhead” and “Blood Simple,” respectively. He would also work with the Coens as a producer on 1987’s “Raising Arizona.”

At a 2010 tribute ceremony, Lynch praised Barenholtz in a bizarre video, crediting him with helping start his career.

Also Read: Beth Chapman, Wife of 'Dog the Bounty Hunter,' Dies at 51

“Ben saved my life in films,” Lynch said. “To oversee getting a good print, Ben gave me a room in his house. He gave me money to get food. He said I only ate McDonald’s and only drank coffee. Thank you, Ben. You deserve awards.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Billy Drago, Star of 'The Untouchables,' Dies at 73

Beth Chapman, Wife of 'Dog the Bounty Hunter,' Dies at 51

Steve Dunleavy, New York Post Reporter and Columnist, Dies at 81

www.thewrap.com | 6/27/19

Just when you thought the Cannes Film Festival was winding down, Abdellatif Kechiche drops a bombshell on the Croisette. Thursday night’s premiere inspired outcry and even walkouts over an explicit scene of apparently unsimulated oral sex.

Critics regarded the French-Tunisian director’s latest film “Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo” as something of a massive troll of his critics. “Mektoub,” a sequel in fact to 2017’s “Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno,” was a three-and-a-half hour film (cut down from an originally announced four hours) that spends considerable time leering at women, including a 15-minute sequence in which the film’s star performs oral sex on a man in a bathroom. Yes, really.

“It’s the same length as ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ and literally 60% of the movie is close-ups of butts. I had a mild psychotic break at one point,” IndieWire‘s David Ehlrich wrote on Twitter.

Also Read: 'Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo' Film Review: Abdellatif Kechiche Trolls Cannes With NSFW Excess

“Abdellatif Kechiche spends three-and-a-half hours ogling his actresses’ butts and sticking his thumb up his own,” Justin Chang of the L.A. Times wrote.

“More than anything else, the film feels like a giant troll, a libidinous F-you to every one of the director’s critics. In amplifying everything deemed problematic about his previous work while stripping away all of their saving graces, Kechiche has basically thrown down the gauntlet and made a film that is nearly impossible to critique,” TheWrap’s Ben Croll wrote in his review.

Kechiche has been a polarizing, provocative figure among critics since he won the Palme d’Or in 2013 for his film “Blue Is the Warmest Color.” And in fact much of the outrage over the film may very well be localized to American critics — or at least that’s the perception abroad.

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 9: Xavier Dolan Grows Up, Neon Falls for 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire'

“‘Intermezzo’ is an incredible gesture of cinema, radical, hypnotic, a search for love and sensuality in an almost uninterrupted trance. Less immediately strong than ‘Canto UNO’ but a crazy experience. Kechiche’s going to get crucified,” one French writer tweeted.

“Kechiche revolutionizes the Cannes Film Festival: the guy throws you the night of the movie in the room. Even Gaspar Noé had never thought of it,” another French critic added.

As for what Kechiche himself was thinking, he gave only a quick remark at his press conference before leaving: “I apologize for having kept you…without warning you. And that’s it, I’m leaving.”

Also Read: 'Blue Is the Warmest Color' Director Slams Star, Threatens Legal Action

Kechiche’s film “Blue Is the Warmest Color” was widely acclaimed when it won the Palme in 2013, but the film’s stars, Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux later criticized Kechiche for their treatment during explicit, hardcore lesbian sex scenes featured throughout the movie.

In 2018, the director was also accused of sexual assault by a 29-year-old woman who says she dined with the director but could not remember the events of the evening after several glasses of alcohol. But she claims she awoke and was lying on a couch with Kechiche fondling her. Lawyers for Kechiche said in a statement that the filmmaker “categorically denies” the accusations, according to the French news network BFMTV.

Also Read: 'The Traitor' Film Review: Sturdy Mafia Biopic Loses Something in Translation

“The Traitor” Sells Out

Sony Pictures Classics acquired the North American rights to “Il Traditore,” or “The Traitor,” an Italian mob drama from director Marco Bellocchio that also had its world premiere on Thursday, an individual with knowledge told TheWrap.

The film is about a mob boss who is scorned by his associates and finds a moment of redemption by ratting out his confederates. And the film is notable because its star, Pierfrancesco Favino, was himself a former mob figure who turned over evidence that ultimately led to bringing down hundreds of Mafiosi. In a crowded, star-studded field, Favino could be a shoo-in to win Cannes’ Best Actor prize, TheWrap’s Ben Croll write, adding that it wouldn’t be a shock to see him as a Bond villain some day.

“As Tommaso Buscetta, the real-life turncoat who helped put 366 different Mafiosi in jail, actor Pierfrancesco Favino really does bring the goods, delivering an exquisite movie-star turn as a godfather whose cocksure magnetism can’t quite hide the pain in his eyes,” Croll wrote.

Deadline first reported news of the acquisition.

Also Read: 'Mano a Mano' Wins Short Film Prize From Cinefondation at Cannes

Cinefondation

Claire Denis Goes “Mano a Mano”

The short film “Mano a Mano,” from French director Louise Courvoisier, won the top prize from the Short Films and Cinéfondation Jury headed by Claire Denis at Cannes.

Cinéfondation recognizes achievements in student films, and the winner even lands a slot for their eventual debut feature at a future Cannes Film Festival. And out of over 2,000 entries and 17 competing films this year, the French film “Mano a Mano” won the top prize, a €15,000 grant.

It’s the story of two circus acrobats traveling from town to town to perform their duet, even as their romantic relationship is falling apart. They’re forced to confront their problems and regain their trust in one another while driving in a small car en route to their next performance.

Second prize went to “Hieu,” directed by Richard Van, and the joint third prize went to both Ambience,” from Wisa Al Jafari in Palestine, and “Duszyczka” (“The Little Soul”) from director Barbara Rupik in Poland.

Quentin Tarantino’s Brandy Wins “Palm Dog”

We’ll await and see if “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood” can win the Palme d’Or, but one of the film’s stars already accepted a far more cooler award, the Palm Dog.

Brandy, a pitbull that appears in Tarantino’s film, won the top prize of a showcase of very good boys and girls delivering the best canine performances at Cannes. Tarantino was even on hand to accept on behalf of Brandy.

“I want to thank the jury from the bottom of my black heart,” the director said on behalf of his now award-winning pup.

???? Palm Dog winner Brandy, with QT ???? #Cannes2019 pic.twitter.com/wfVnJH0GnI

— Tomris Laffly (@TomiLaffly) May 24, 2019

Screen Media Nabs “Crown Vic”

Screen Media acquired the North American rights to writer-director Joel Souza’s police crime thriller “Crown Vic,” which stars Thomas Jane and is produced by Alec Baldwin, the company announced Friday.

The distributor closed terms during Cannes amid a competitive bidding situation, with seven other distributors chasing after the film made its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival last month. Screen Media plans to release the film this fall.

“Crown Vic” follows one explosive night in the life of a seasoned LAPD veteran (Jane) as he takes a young cop (Luke Kleintank) out on patrol and shows him the brutal reality of life behind the wheel of a Crown Vic.

The film was produced by Alec Baldwin and his El Dorado Pictures and Anjul Nigam under his Brittany House Pictures, and Gregg Bello. Maxx Tsai also produced under his China-based Wudi Pictures.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jesse Eisenberg, Antonio Banderas and 19 More Portraits From TheWrap's Cannes Studio (Photos)

Roman Polanski's 'An Officer and a Spy' Screens for Buyers at Cannes

Cannes Struggles for Relevance in Shrinking Movie Business

www.thewrap.com | 5/24/19

The short film “Mano a Mano,” from French director Louise Courvoisier, won the top prize from the Short Films and Cinéfondation Jury headed by Claire Denis at Cannes, the festival announced Thursday.

The jury led by Denis and consisting of Stacy Martin, Eran Kolirin, Panos H. Koutras and C?t?lin Mitulescu chose the winners between 17 student films out of 2,000 entries from 366 film schools around the world. The awards were presented at the 2019 Cinéfondation Prizes, now in its 22nd edition, during a ceremony held in the Buñuel Theatre, followed by the screening of the winning films.

The Cinéfondation allocates a €15,000 grant for the first prize, €11,250 for the second and €7,500 for the third. The winner of the first prize is also guaranteed the presentation of his or her first feature film at a future Cannes Film Festival. The awarded films will also be screened at the Cinéma du Panthéon on May 28.

Also Read: 'I Lost My Body,' 'Vivarium' Win Prizes in Cannes Critics' Week Section

First prize went to “Mano a Mano,” directed by Courvoisier and from the school CinéFabrique in France. It’s the story of two circus acrobats traveling from town to town to perform their duet, even as their romantic relationship is falling apart. They’re forced to confront their problems and regain their trust in one another while driving in a small car en route to their next performance.

Second prize went to “Hieu,” directed by Richard Van of CalArts in the US. The short is about a Vietnamese-American household that receives a surprise visit from a long-lost patriarch after he fails at a get-rich-quick scheme.

Finally, a joint third prize was awarded to both “Ambience” directed by Wisa Al Jafari out of the Dar al-Kalima University College of Arts and Culture in Palestine and “Duszyczka” (“The Little Soul”) from director Barbara Rupik at PWSFTviT in Poland.

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 9: Xavier Dolan Grows Up, Neon Falls for 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire'

“Ambience” is about two young Palestinians who try to record a demo for a music competition inside a noisy, crowded refugee camp, only to discover a creative method to complete their deadline.

“The Little Soul” looks at a dead body that became stuck by a river bank. Its decaying insides still hide a human soul – a miniature of the deceased. When the organs rot, a tiny creature escapes, and it says goodbye to the corpse before setting off on a journey through the post-mortem land.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jesse Eisenberg, Antonio Banderas and 19 More Portraits From TheWrap's Cannes Studio (Photos)

Roman Polanski's 'An Officer and a Spy' Screens for Buyers at Cannes

Cannes Report, Day 8: Quentin Tarantino's 'Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood' Steals the Show

www.thewrap.com | 5/23/19

The internet started to take on momentum in the 1990s. At that time many analysts, myself included, marveled at the opportunity of creating a platform that would boost grassroot democracy. There was no need for a middleman and there were few barriers to ordinary people becoming involved. This included organizing groups, discussions and events, sharing knowledge, insights and information, publishing opinions — just some of the potential attached to the internet. And for the first two decades, this basically was what happened, in a very positive and constructive way. It did disrupt several business, social and political models but that that was seen as 'a new broom sweeping clean.'

All of that is still happening — and as a matter of fact, it has only increased. However, at the same time, the ugly side of humanity has moved into this area as well. They all jumped on the bandwagon — cheats, plain criminals, misogynists, racists and bullies. This was very unfortunate, but it became serious when more organized misuse of the internet began to take place. This is undermining democracy and democratic processes; many people began to say enough is enough.

Most of the misuse is aimed at generating fake traffic that leads to extra advertising income or click income on YouTube for instance. In proportion to overall internet activity the other, serious political misuse is significantly less. It has, however, far deeper negative consequences. It is using manipulation to set people against each other. It interferes with democratic processes such as elections and undermines democratic institutions.

This criminal internet activity happens more or less in parallel with broader traditional forms of manipulations and is not limited to the internet. The fake news activities and the undermining of democratic institutions are for example carried out by President Trump without the internet. The same is happening in countries such as Britain, Turkey, Hungary, Poland and Italy, to name just a few.

There is no doubt that the internet has become an important tool to create division, hatred and conflict. This has more to do with human behaviour than with technology. Addressing only the technology element of this problem will not solve the much more serious underlying issues.

Division, lies, hatred, fake news, racism and conflict are being used by our leaders in public. It is then not difficult to understand that people perceive this as a license to do the same, with or without technology.

It is important to state that it is not the internet that is causing all of this. So far the internet has created far more positive than negative outcomes, and we need to preserve what's best about it. Most importantly, this includes the freedom for people to express themselves. Equally important is that entrepreneurs can innovate and build new business models. At the same time, we need to ensure that we protect society from broader harm.

We can look at what we have done with other tools that we use — tools like guns, cars, chemicals and drugs. All these products and services can have negatives associated with them. What we have done over the years to address this is to build elements into these products and services to limit the risk and increase safety.

This has been done through the hard work of everyone involved: the government and industry, as well as the users/consumers. As an example, look at cars in the 1970s. They killed 3 to 4 times more people than they do now, and our population has nearly doubled over that period. How did this change happen? Partly through regulation, partly through better products, and partly through human behaviour.

Have we, as a result, eliminated all the harmful elements of motor cars? No, of course not. But the risks have been reduced considerably over those years. This to such a level that the negative (e.g., death by car accidents) seems to be acceptable to most of us. Is that enough? No, it isn't. And so we are still trying to improve, through the combined efforts of government, industry and us, the people.

We will also have to begin to develop similar processes in relation to the internet. However, before we know what we need to do, we will first have to drill down to where the problems are and work out who can do what in addressing the issues.

Starting with the government, Mark Zuckerberg mentioned the need for a more active role for governments and regulators. He suggested the need for an update of the rules for the internet. In particularly in four areas: harmful content, election integrity, privacy and data portability.

In relation to the industry, he recommends starting with data manipulation aimed at defrauding the internet companies. Here the social media companies have a vested interest in tackling that problem themselves as fraud cost them money. The tools that they develop to minimize this can also be used to address other data manipulation issues — for example, interferences in elections and fake news. As Zuckerburg indicated, the government will also have to play a key role in setting up the rules for this. This will also need to be done at international levels.

It will remain a cat and mouse situation. New — more sophisticated — technologies to combat this will be developed, and they will be circumvented by criminals, and this process will continue. In the end, criminal interferences will be greatly reduced. The reason being that it simply becomes too costly for many of the groups to come up with their own tools to crack the ones developed by industry. The best hope here is for a managed situation, similar to those that have been created to manage other potentially dangerous tools, as in the motor car example.

A challenging issue here is the fact that what is harmful to one society, culture or religion is not necessarily the same for another group. A real threat — or even perhaps a reality — is that this would lead to a further regionalization of the internet. Countries such as China, Iran and North Korea have already created their own walls around the internet, and Russia is also trying to build its wall.

Another issue in relation to the industry is whether some of these companies are becoming too dominant and are showing monopolistic tendencies. A very human reaction to this is that we don't tolerate monopolies. We, therefore, need to start looking at industry legislation, be it anti-trust remedies, breaking up companies or other solutions.

Lastly, we also need to drill down on the people's side. We need to identify and address what causes the problematic behaviour of those misusing the internet before we can address these issues. Education and information at schools and elsewhere will be important. They will deliver longer-term positive outcomes.

Full-blown criminal behavior, racism, hate speech and the like are already punishable under existing laws. Our enforcement agencies, however, are still not well-equipped to address Internet-based crimes as effectively as they address similar crimes conducted in more traditional ways.

I am sometimes alerted by people who read my analyses to information or activities that are of an illegal or criminal nature. I report them to the appropriate authorities, but I have never received an answer from them. And if one goes to a police station to report internet abuse that will still too often elicit a blank look from the officer at the desk.

In order to get the people on board here, they need to be supported by well-functioning institutions. They should be able to take effective action against individuals that are crossing the line online. At the moment there is a feeling among the public that they are losing control over some of the central mechanisms of their lives. In the case of the internet, the lives of most people have been improved, and it has created lots of new economic activity. At the same time, it is also clear that the negatives of technology are such that people are not comfortable with the risks and safety issues. Comparing this with the example of motor cars, it is obvious that more work is needed. And whether we like it or not, people want action now.

So far this is resulting in some countries introducing broad and vague sweeping laws. Laws which are not implemented effectively, because it is impossible to do so while they are still being written. We clearly need to improve on that.

This will become increasingly apparent as time goes on. My colleagues in America say that the problems with the hastily introduced social media legislation will soon become evident in Australia. Other countries will learn from these mistakes and will adopt more realistic legislation to safeguard innovation, economic growth and freedom of speech. These core democratic elements seem to become the casualties of bad legislation. With a lack of effective self-regulation from the digital media giants, there is however no doubt that major changes to these negative elements in the use of the of the Internet will increasingly be regulated and legislated.

Written by Paul Budde, Managing Director of Paul Budde Communication

www.circleid.com | 4/24/19

Pawel Pawlikowski’s “Cold War” has been named the best European film of 2018 at the European Film Awards, which were handed out on Saturday in Seville, Spain.

The decade-spanning drama, which was inspired by the stormy relationship between Pawlikowski’s parents, also won awards for its director, screenplay, lead actress (Joanna Kulig) and editor.

Marcello Fonte won the best-actor award for “Dogman,” which also took awards for its costume design and hair and makeup.

Also Read: 'Cold War' Film Review: Romance in Postwar Europe Is Ravishing and Haunted

Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin” was named the best European comedy, while “Bergman – A Year in a Life” won for documentary, and “Another Day of Life” won for animated film.

Four of the Best European Film Award nominees — “Border,” “Cold War,” “Dogman” and “Girl” — are the foreign-language Oscar entries from Sweden, Poland, Italy and Belgium, respectively. The fifth, “Happy as Lazzaro,” played in Cannes but was bypassed as Italy’s Oscar selection in favor of “Dogman.”

No film that has won the European Film Award for best film has ever won the Best Picture Oscar, though three (“The Full Monty,” “Life Is Beautiful” and “Amour”) have been nominated. Six EFA winners — “Life Is Beautiful,” “All About My Mother,” “The Lives of Others,” “Amour,” “The Great Beauty” and “Ida” — have won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

Also Read: 'The Favourite' Dominates the British Independent Film Awards

The 2018 European Film Award winners:

Best European Film: “Cold War”
European Director: Pawel Pawlikowski, “Cold War”
European Comedy: “The Death of Stalin”
European Actor: Marcello Fonte, “Dogman”
European Actress: Joanna Kulig, “Cold War”

European Screenwriter: Pawel Pawlikowski, “Cold War”
European Documentary: “Bergman –A Year in a Life”
European Animated Film: “Another Day of Life”
European Short Film: “The Years”
European Discovery/Prix Fipresci: “Girl”

European Cinematographer: Martin Otterbeck “U-July 22”
European Editor: Jaroslaw Kaminski, “Cold War”
European Production Designer: Andrey Ponkratov, “The Summer”
European Costume Designer: Massimo Cantini Parrini, “Dogman”
European Hair and Make-Up Artist: Dalia Colli, Lorenzo Tamburini & Daniela Tartari, “Dogman”
European Composer
: Christoph M. Kaiser and Julian Maas, “3 Days in Quiberon”
European Sound Designer: Andre Bendocci-Alves and Martin Steyer, “The Captain”
European Visual Effects Supervisor: Peter Hjorth, “Border”

EFA People’s Choice Award: “Call Me by Your Name”
European Achievement in World Cinema: Ralph Fiennes
EFA Lifetime Achievement Award: Carmen Maura
Honorary Award: Costa-Gavras

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why Annapurna Needs 'Beale Street' and 'Vice' to Score With Audiences as Well as Awards Voters

SAG Awards Nominations Are Great News for 'A Star Is Born,' But Not for 'The Favourite'

Golden Globes Nominations Analysis: 'Vice' and 'Green Book' Emerge as Curious Front Runners

www.thewrap.com | 12/15/18

It won’t exactly be on a par with Oscars nominations morning, but Monday will be one of the biggest December days in the history of the Academy Awards.

That’s because for the first time, the Academy isn’t systematically doling out the short lists of films that remain in contention. Instead, they’re dropping all the lists at once in a single press release that will trim the fields in Best Documentary Feature, Best Foreign Language Film, Best Original Song and six other categories.

One drop, nine categories, a total of 101 films that’ll get good news and far more that’ll be disappointed.

The strategy of dumping all the Oscars short lists at once has not been greeted with universal approval. For one thing, contenders in the different categories were used to having their individual moments in the spotlight. Music Branch voters, who are facing a pair of short lists for the first time, now have far less time to listen and decide than they used to. And pundits will need to whip up instant analysis in nine categories simultaneously.

Also Read: Oscars' Best Picture Category Needs Fixing - Here's an Easy Way to Do It

But that’s the new rule, and all the lists will be out on the afternoon of Monday, Dec. 17.

(By the way, we hear that the news will come out in the afternoon because the procrastinators on the Foreign Language Film Award Executive Committee aren’t getting together until Monday morning to decide which three songs they’ll be adding to the six-film short list chosen by Oscars voters.)

Here’s the category-by-category breakdown of what will be coming on Monday.

Best Foreign Language Film
Number of films on the short list: 9

Three films seem guaranteed to land a spot: Mexico’s “Roma,” Poland’s “Cold War” and Lebanon’s “Capernaum.” Belgium’s “Girl” isn’t far behind, and voters reportedly adored Germany’s “Never Look Away.” Denmark’s “The Guilty” is a satisfying film that impressed voters, Sweden’s “Border” a twisted one that did the same.

The executive committee that adds three films to the shortlist may be hard-pressed not to take one or both of the two Asian standouts, South Korea’s “Burning” and Japan’s Palme d’Or winner “Shoplifters.” And watch out for the Paraguayan film, “The Heiresses,” which has strong support in both the general and executive committees.

Other possibilities include Iceland’s “Woman at War,” Norway’s “What Will People Say,” Colombia’s “Birds of Passage,” Hungary’s “Sunset” and Romania’s “I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians.”

Also Read: Oscars Foreign Language Race 2018: Complete List of Submissions

Best Documentary Feature
Number of films on the short list: 15

The four box-office hits that made this one of the best years ever for nonfiction filmmaking should all land on the list: “Free Solo,” “RBG,” “Three Identical Strangers” and the de facto frontrunner, “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” (On the other hand, it’d be uncharacteristic of the Academy not to leave at least one of them off the final list of five nominees, and not entirely surprising if one of them doesn’t make the short list.)

Ever since the doc-branch rules were changed to do away with special screening committees in this category, voters have gravitated toward the films that have gotten the most buzz and received the most nominations for the IDA Awards, the Cinema Eye Honors and the like. That should mean that critical and awards favorites like “Minding the Gap,” “Hale County This Morning, This Evening,” “Crime + Punishment,” “Bisbee ’17,” “Dark Money,” “Of Fathers and Sons” and “Shirkers” will all be in contention. And watch out for the Spanish film “The Silence of Others,” a potential sleeper.

We also shouldn’t rule out documentary legend Frederick Wiseman for “Monrovia, Indiana,” or other well-received docs like “On Her Shoulders,” “The Bleeding Edge” and “United Skates.” On the showbiz doc front, movies like “Hal,” “Filmworker” and “Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blache” have a shot, as does the released-at-last Aretha Franklin movie “Amazing Grace” and the Quincy Jones doc “Quincy,” whose subject has been highly visible on the campaign circuit lately. And I refuse to abandon hope that voters will recognize Eugene Jarecki’s sharp Elvis-and-America meditation “The King.”

Finally, Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 11/9,” the followup to the top-grossing nonfiction film of all time, has been bypassed by nearly all the precursor awards and may well be left off of this one as well. But Moore could still find a way in — after all, he was the prime mover on the changes that led to the current method of picking the short list, and he’s still a strong voice in the doc world.

Also Read: 'Minding the Gap' Wins Top Honor at IDA Documentary Awards

Best Original Song
Number of songs on the short list: 15

The two music categories are introducing short lists for the first time ever, presumably in order to give all the members of the music branch to hear and consider the 15 semi-finalists before voting for nominations. But that means they have less time to consider all the contenders, which this year number more than 70 in the song category.

Yes, we know that “Shallow,” the one song entered from “A Star Is Born,” will make it. And probably at least one of the two songs entered from “Mary Poppins Returns.” The Music Branch’s taste for hip-hop might be tested by “All the Stars” from “Black Panther,” but why wouldn’t they want Kendrick Lamar at the Oscars?

They also have to consider songs from luminaries like Dolly Parton (“Girl in the Movies” from “Dumplin'”), Annie Lennox (“Requiem for a Private War” from “A Private War”), plus two competitive songs from movies about Ruth Bader Ginsburg: “I’ll Fight” from “RBG” (written by nine-time nominee Diane Warren) and “Here Comes the Change” from “On the Basis of Sex.” “Revelation” from “Boy Erased” has a real shot, as does “Gravity” from “Free Solo.” And if they want to get truly adventurous, how about the Coup’s “OYAHYTT” from “Sorry to Bother You,” or Thom Yorke’s “Suspirium” from “Suspiria”? (Would the Radiohead frontman show up at the Oscars?)

The branch is well known for taking care of its own, which can’t hurt past winner Carole Bayer Sager’s “Living in the Moment” from “Book Club.” They also tend to like songs that are performed onscreen — which, in addition to being one more reason “Shallow” will get in, could help the songs from “Hearts Beat Loud,” the quintessential but twisted Disney-princess anthem from “Ralph Breaks the Internet” or the fatalistic cowboy tune “When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs for Wings” from “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.”

And then there are songs from Patti Smith and Robyn Hitchcock and Elton John and Arlissa and Quincy Jones and Post Malone and Kendra Smith and Aoife O’Donovan and Imagine Dragons and Sade and David Crosby … It’s a deep list, not a shallow one. (Sorry.)

Also Read: How Movie Songs By Kendrick Lamar, Kesha and Troye Sivan Hope to Last Beyond Their Films (Video)

Best Original Score
Number of films on the short list: 15

As usual, more than 100 scores are in contention, with early awards singling out a group that includes “Black Panther,” “First Man,” “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “Isle of Dogs,” “Mary Poppins Returns,” “A Quiet Place,” “Mary Queen of Scots” and “Green Book.” Most and perhaps all of those should make the list, with other contenders including “BlacKkKlansman,” “Can You Ever Forgive Me?,” “On the Basis of Sex,” “The Hate U Give,” “Hereditary,” “Bad Times at the El Royale,” “Red Sparrow,” “The Predator” and “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Number of films on the short list: No more than 7

This is a category that’ll likely have three nominees, and one known for nominating films that won’t show up in any other category. This year, that could mean a “Suspiria” appearance on the short list. “Black Panther” and “The Avengers: Infinity War” will certainly be in play — and since makeup designed to make actors look like other people is usually a mainstay in the category, look for “Vice” and “Stan & Ollie” to show up as well. “Mary Queen of Scots” could make the cut too. And will Rami Malek’s Freddie Mercury teeth from “Bohemian Rhapsody” be enough to land that film a spot?

If a foreign film gets in, as one sometimes does (“A Man Called Ove,” “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared”), it could be “Border,” which turned a couple of actors into trolls.

Also Read: 'Border' Film Review: Are Moviegoers Ready for Hot, Hairy Troll Sex?

Best Visual Effects
Number of films on the short list: 10

A committee from the Visual Effects Branch has already narrowed the field to 20 films, so now it’s just a matter of cutting that number in half. The elaborate visions of “Avengers: Infinity War,” “Black Panther,” “Ready Player One” and perhaps “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindewald” and “Solo: A Star Wars Story” are clearly contenders, with the subtler effects of “First Man” and the more retro charms of “Mary Poppins Returns” definitely in the mix as well.

Dark horses could include “Christopher Robin” and “Paddington 2” for their blend of live action and CG figures, and the stop-motion “Isle of Dogs,” which would be following in the footsteps of recent nominee “Kubo and the Two Strings.” Several late-breaking films have a shot as well, including “Aquaman,” “Bumblebee” and “Welcome to Marwen.”

Best Documentary Short
Number of films on the short list: 10

The shorts categories are hard to predict because most of the films haven’t been widely seen. But Academy volunteers have been watching them to compile the three lists, and it’s possible to pick up some buzz from festival screenings and awards campaigns.

Netflix has been a major player in doc shorts recently (it won its first Oscar for “The White Helmets”), and this year it has “Zion,” “Out of Many, One,” “End Game” and “Lessons From a School Shooting: Notes From Dunblane,” at least two of which should end up on the list. The New York Times Op-Docs series has “Dulce,” “Earthrise,” “We Became Fragments” and the wry and well-liked “My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes,” the only short nominated by both the IDA Awards and Cinema Eye Honors.

Other IDA and Cinema Eye nominees include “Black Sheep,” “Baby Brother,” “Concussion Protocol,” “Fear Us Women,” “Lifeboat,” “Los Comandos,” “Mosul,” “Sidelined,” “Skip Day,” “The Girl and the Picture,” “Volte” and “We Are Not Done Yet.” The DOC NYC short list also singled out “’63 Boycott,” “The Head & the Hand,” “RX Early Detection” and “Take Back the Harbor,” while “Lotte That Silhouette Girl” tells the story of a woman animation pioneer from the pre-Disney days and could be attractive to the Academy.

Also Read: ShortList 2018: How 'My Dead Dad's Porno Tapes' Explores Family Secrets (Video)

Best Animated Short
Number of films on the short list: 10

The Annie Awards, the top prize given to animated films, singled out “Grandpa Walrus,” “Lost & Found,” “Solar Walk,” “Untravel” and “Weekends.” Pixar’s big short this year is “Bao,” and Pixar’s big short usually gets nominated. DreamWorks Animation, which has less consistent success in the category, is represented by “Bilby” and “Bird Karma.”

Other possibilities include “La Noria,” “Animal Behavior,” “Crow: The Legend” and “Age of Sail,” a Google Spotlight VR short made by John Kahrs, who won an Oscar for “Paperman.” “Raccoon and the Light,” “Daisy,” “The Green Bird” and “Re-Gifted” qualified by winning Student Academy Awards, while “The Driver Is Red” won the industry prize at theWrap’s ShortList Film Festival.

Best Live-Action Short
Number of films on the short list: 10

In a category where it’s almost impossible to get an overview of the field unless you’re a festival shorts programmer, standouts include “Fauve,” “Wren Boys,” “Skin” and “Bonbone,” as well as “Souls of Totality,” featuring Tatiana Maslany, and “Dear Chickens,” with Philip Baker Hall.

Timely films about the refugee crisis in Europe include “Bismillah” and “Magic Alps,” and Student Academy Award qualifiers are “Spring Flower,” “Lalo’s House,” “This Is Your Cuba,” “Get Ready With Me,” “Almost Everything” and “A Siege”; if history is any guide, at least one of them will make the list.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jerry Seinfeld Says Kevin Hart 'Is Going to Be Fine' After Oscars Fallout (Video)

A Hostless Oscars? The Last Time the Academy Tried That, Things Got Ugly

10 Things We Learned at the Oscars' 10th Governors Awards

www.thewrap.com | 12/14/18

In a year that has seen multiple documentaries find mainstream success, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences released the list of 166 docs that have been submitted for Oscar consideration this year.

Among the films on the list are Michael Moore’s anti-Trump polemic “Fahrenheit 11/9,” as well as CNN Films’ Ruth Bader Ginsburg biography “RBG” and Focus’ Mister Rogers retrospective “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

Other films considered frontrunners include “Three Identical Strangers,” the wild story of triplets who were separated at birth by a bizarre experiment, “Free Solo,” which documents the first ever attempt to climb Yosemite’s El Capitan without any climbing gear, and “Dark Money,” an investigative report into the influence of billionaires on American democracy through the lens of a Montana congressional race.

Also Read: Sorry, Oscar Documentary Voters: Your Workload Just Doubled

The contender field is slightly less than last year’s record field of 170 but does include, for the first time, films that have won a qualifying award at a competitive film festival or have been submitted in the Foreign Language Film category as their country’s official selection. As always, documentaries are also eligible for other categories, including Best Picture, though no documentary has ever been nominated for the Academy’s top prize in its 90-year history.

A shortlist of 15 documentaries will be announced on Dec. 17, with the final nominations announced on Jan. 22. The 91st Academy Awards will be held Feb. 24 in Hollywood.

Also Read: 'Free Solo,' 'Minding the Gap,' 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' Land IDA Documentary Nominations

See the full alphabetical list below:

“Above and Beyond: NASA’S Journey to Tomorrow“

“Active Measures”

“Amazing Grace”

“American Chaos”

“Andy Irons: Kissed by God”

“Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco”

“Avicii: True Stories”

“Bali: Beats of Paradise”

“Bathtubs over Broadway”

“Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché”

“Believer”

“Better Angels”

“Bill Coors: The Will to Live”

“Bisbee ’17”

“The Bleeding Edge”

“Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat”

“Breaking Point: The War for Democracy in Ukraine”

“Call Her Ganda”

“Charm City”

“Chef Flynn”

“The China Hustle”

“Christian Audigier The Vif”

“The Cleaners”

“Communion”

“Crime + Punishment”

“Dark Money”

“Daughters of the Sexual Revolution: The Untold Story of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders”

“The Dawn Wall”

“The Distant Barking of Dogs”

“Divide and Conquer: The Story of Roger Ailes”

“Drug$”

“Eating Animals”

“Eldorado”

“Fahrenheit 11/9”

“Fail State”

“Family in Transition”

“Far from the Tree”

“Filmworker”

“The First Patient”

“Foreign Land”

“40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie”

“Free Solo”

“Garry Winogrand: All Things Are Photographable”

“Generation Wealth”

“Ghost Hunting”

“Ghosthunter”

“The Gilligan Manifesto”

“The Gospel According to André”

“Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami”

“Graves without a Name”

“The Great Buster: A Celebration”

“Hal”

“Hale County This Morning, This Evening”

“Half the Picture”

“The Heart of Nuba”

“Hillbilly”

“The Homeless Chorus Speaks”

“Hondros”

“Howard”

“In Search of Greatness”

“In the Land of Pomegranates”

“Inventing Tomorrow“

“Invisible Hands”

“Itzhak”

“Jane Fonda in Five Acts”

“John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection”

“The Judge”

“Kangaroo: A Love Hate Story”

“Killer Bees”

“The King”

“King in the Wilderness”

“Kusama – Infinity”

“The Last Race”

“Leaning into the Wind: Andy Goldsworthy”

“Letter from Masanjia”

“Licu, a Romanian Story”

“Living in the Future’s Past”

“Liyana”

“Lots of Kids, a Monkey and a Castle”

“Love & Bananas: An Elephant Story”

“Love, Cecil”

“Love, Gilda”

“Love Is Tolerance – Tolerance Is Love – Make Tolerance Great Again!”

“Making The Five Heartbeats”

“Maria by Callas”

“Matangi / Maya / M.I.A.”

“McQueen”

“Minding the Gap”

“Monrovia, Indiana”

“The Most Unknown”

“New Moon”

“93Queen”

“Nossa Chape”

“Of Fathers and Sons”

“Of Love & Law”

“On Her Shoulders”

“Opera about Poland

“The Opera House”

“The Oslo Diaries”

“The Other Side of Everything”

“The Panama Papers”

“Path of Blood”

“People’s Republic of Desire”

“Philosopher King – Lee Teng-hui’s Dialogue”

“Pick of the Litter”

“Piripkura”

“Police Killing”

“Pope Francis – A Man of His Word”

“The Price of Everything”

“The Price of Free”

“Qiu (Inmates)”

“Quincy”

“RBG”

“The Rachel Divide”

“The Raft”

“Recovery Boys”

“Restoring Tomorrow“

“Reversing Roe”

“The Road Movie”

“Robin Williams: Come inside My Mind”

“Ruben Blades Is Not My Name”

“Samouni Road”

“Saving Brinton”

“Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland”

“Science Fair”

“Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood”

“Searching for Ingmar Bergman”

“Seeing Allred”

“The Sentence”

“Shirkers”

“Shot in the Dark”

“The Silence of Others”

“Sisters of the Wilderness”

“A Son of Man”

“Songwriter”

“Stan”

“Studio 54”

“Summer in the Forest”

“Tea with the Dames”

“That Summer”

“That Way Madness Lies…”

“They Fight”

“They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead”

“This Is Congo”

“This Is Home: A Refugee Story”

“Three Identical Strangers”

“To Be Continued”

“Transformer”

“Travel Ban”

“The Trial”

“Triumph: The Untold Story of Perry Wallace”

“Trust Machine”

“Under the Wire”

“United Skates”

“Unknown Distance”

“Up Down and Sideways”

“The Waldheim Waltz”

“We Could Be Heroes”

“Weed the People”

“What Haunts Us”

“What Lies Upstream”

“Whitney”

“Wonderful Losers: A Different World”

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

“Yellow Is Forbidden”

“Yellowing”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sorry, Oscar Documentary Voters: Your Workload Just Doubled

'Free Solo,' 'Minding the Gap,' 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' Land IDA Documentary Nominations

'Free Solo' Sets Documentary Record at Indie Box Office

www.thewrap.com | 11/8/18

Members of the Academy’s documentary branch received a generous gift from AMPAS on Friday: 77 new films that had qualified in this year’s Best Documentary Feature category.

And it turned what had been a modest year for docs — with a total of 83 films included in June, July, August and September groups — into one in which the number of eligible films that voters would need to watch nearly doubled.

The Academy also promised voters in the branch to expect a final batch of films in early November — which, if it hits double digits, will set a new record in the category.

Also Read: 'Free Solo' Leads Critics' Choice Documentary Awards Nominations

The previous high, set last year, was 170 films. With 160 already on the Oscar eligibility list and one additional (though likely small) batch yet to come, this year’s crop will give voters a lot of work to do before they vote in early December to narrow the field to a 15-film short list.

This year’s films are also coming later than usual; in the past, the largest group of films typically came in September, with the field being topped off by a smaller batch in October.

For years, doc-branch voters received periodic shipments of DVD screeners, which would start after new members were invited in June and would typically end in October. These days, though, the qualifying films are made available not on physical screeners, but for streaming on the Academy’s secure member website.

Each month beginning in June, branch members are sent an email detailing which films have been added to the site — and to ensure that every eligible film is seen, members are also randomly assigned certain films to watch.

(Each member is free to see any films not on his or her assigned list as well.)

Also Read: Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Mr. Rogers Will Be Competing at the Cinema Eye Honors

June’s batch of films, which included “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” and “RBG,” consisted of only 13 docs. July’s, including “Seeing Allred” and “Three Identical Strangers,” was made up of 19. August’s 18 included “The Bleeding Edge,” “Dark Money,” “Eating Animals” and “Generation Wealth.” September’s total jumped to 33, including “Crime + Punishment,” “Free Solo,” “Hal” and “The King.”

But with 77 films on a list members received near the end of the month, October dwarfed all of those. It brought in such significant Oscars contenders as “Fahrenheit 11/9,” “Hale County This Morning, This Evening,” “Hillbilly,” “Jane Fonda in Five Acts,” “Maria by Callas,” “Monrovia, Indiana,” “On Her Shoulders,” “Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood” and “Tea With the Dames.”

It also included several films that have qualified in the doc-feature category by being submitted by their home country in the Oscars foreign-language race: Switzerland’s “Eldorado,” Palestine’s “Ghost Hunting,” Panama’s “Ruben Blades Is Not My Name,” Austria’s “The Waldheim Waltz,” Lithuania’s “Wonderful Losers: A Different World” and Ecuador’s doc/narrative hybrid, “A Son of Man.”

Along with the features, Oscars doc-branch voters are also given access to a group of short documentaries each month — and again, October’s group was the largest. A total of 124 short films have qualified so far, with 24 made accessible to voters in July, 18 in August, 18 in September and 44 in October.

Also Read: 'Free Solo,' 'Minding the Gap,' 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' Land IDA Documentary Nominations

Here is the complete list of films that have qualified and have been made available to Oscar doc voters so far. This is not the final list of eligible films, which the Academy will announce once the final group of films goes to members in early November.

“Above and Beyond: NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow”
“Active Measures”
“Amazing Grace”
“American Chaos”
“Andy Irons: Kissed by God”
“Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco”
“Avicii: True Stories”

“Bali: Beats of Paradise”
“Bathtubs Over Broadway”
“Better Angels”
“Believer”
“Bill Coors: The Will to Live”
“Bisbee ’17”
“The Bleeding Edge”
“Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat”
“Breaking Point: The War for Democracy in Ukraine”

“Call Her Ganda”
“Charm City”
“Chef Flynn”
“The China Hustle”
“Christian Audigier the Vif”
“The Cleaners”
“Communion”
“Crime + Punishment”

“Daughters of the Sexual Revolution: The Untold Story of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders”
“The Dawn Wall”
“Dark Money”
“The Distant Barking of Dogs”
“Divide and Conquer: The Story of Roger Ailes”
“Drug$”

“Eating Animals”
“Eldorado”

“Fahrenheit 11/9”
“Fail State”
“Family in Transition”
“Far From the Tree”
“Filmworker”
“The First Patient”
“Foreign Land”
“40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie”
“Free Solo”

“Garry Winograd: All Things Are Photographable”
“Generation Wealth”
“Ghost Hunting”
“Ghosthunter”
“The Gilligan Manifesto”
“The Gospel According to Andre”
“Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami”
“The Great Buster: A Celebration”

“Hal”
“Half the Picture”
“Hale County This Morning, This Evening”
“The Heart of Nuba”
“Hillbilly”
“The Homeless Chorus Speaks”
“Hondros”
“Howard”

“In the Land of Pomegranates”
“In Search of Greatness”
“Inventing Tomorrow”
“Invisible Hands”
“Itzhak”

“Jane Fonda in Five Acts”
“John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection”
“The Judge”

“Kangaroo: A Love Hate Story”
“Killer Bees”
“The King”
“King in the Wilderness”
“Kusama – Infinity”

“The Last Race”
“Leaning Into the Wind: Andy Goldsworthy”
“Letter From Masanjia”
“Licu, A Romanian Story”
“Living in the Future’s Past”
“Liyana”
“Lots of Kids, a Monkey and a Castle”
“Love & Bananas: An Elephant Story”
“Love, Cecil”
“Love, Gilda”
“Love Is Tolerance – Tolerance Is Love – Make Tolerance Great Again”

“Making the Five Heartbeats”
“Maria by Callas”
“Matangi/Maya/M.I.A.”
“McQueen”
“Minding the Gap”
“Monrovia, Indiana”
“The Most Unknown”

“New Moon”
“93Queen”
“Nossa Chape”

“Of Fathers and Sons”
“Of Love & Law”
“On Her Shoulders”
“Opera About Poland
“The Opera House”
“The Oslo Diaries”
“The Other Side of Everything”

“The Panama Papers”
“Path of Blood”
“People’s Republic of Desire”
“Pick of the Litter”
“Piripkura”
“Police Killing”
“Pope Francis – A Man of His Word”
“The Price of Everything”
“The Price of Free”

“Qiu (Inmates)”
“Quincy”

“The Rachel Divide”
“The Raft”
“RBG”
“Recovery Boys”
“Restoring Tomorrow”
“Reversing Roe”
“Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind”
“Ruben Blades Is Not My Name”

“Samouni Road”
“Saving Brinton”
“Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland”
“The Road Movie”
“Science Fair”
“Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood”
“Searching for Ingmar Bergman”
“Seeing Allred”
“The Sentence”
“Shirkers”
“Shot in the Dark”
“The Silence of Others”
“Sisters of the Wilderness”
“A Son of Man”
“Songwriter”
“Stan”
“Studio 54”
“Summer in the Forest”

“Tea With the Dames”
“That Summer”
“That Way Madness Lies … “
“They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead”
“This Is Congo”
“This Is Home: A Refugee Story”
“Three Identical Strangers”
“Transformer”
“Travel Ban”
“The Trial”
“Trust Machine”
“Triumph: The Untold Story of Perry Wallace”

“Under the Wire”
“United Skates”
“Up Down and Sideways”

“The Waldheim Waltz”
“We Could Be Heroes”
“Weed the People”
“What Haunts Us”
“What Lies Upstream”
“Whitney”
“A Woman Captured”
“Wonderful Losers: A Different World”
“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

“Yellowing”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Fahrenheit 11/9' Director Michael Moore to Receive Critics' Choice Lifetime Achievement Award

Why Mr. Rogers Is the Perfect Movie Superhero for Our Times (Guest Blog)

'Free Solo' Sets Documentary Record at Indie Box Office

www.thewrap.com | 10/27/18
There's a film festival kicking off this week in Poland called the American Film Festival. The AFF is the fall version of the New Horizons Film Festival (which screens mostly international films in July every year), organized by the New Horizons Association located at the Nowe Horyzonty cinema in the city of Wroclaw, Poland. This rather vibrant, distinct, energetic city is located inbetween Warsaw and Krakow, but much closer to Prague and Dresden. There's a number of big universities in Wroclaw, making it a lively university city with a student population of over 150,000. It's also the perfect place to host these film festivals, because many students love cinema and love to catch all these films from all around the world. I'm happy to be here. This is my second time back to the American Film Festival in Wroclaw, and while it's not exactly easy to get to (only via train/bus/car from Krakow or Warsaw) it's an invigorating and dynamic place. ...

Dozens of powerful men and women have abruptly lost public favor in the past twelve months, from the numerous men toppled by #MeToo movement to comedians who have been shunned for an inappropriate Twitter joke. And that’s only in the last year. Here’s a list of most shocking falls from grace in movie and TV history, from director Roman Polanski to comedian Roseanne Barr to disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.

Fatty Arbuckle

After becoming one of the most successful stars of the silent film era,  Roscoe Conkling “Fatty” Arbuckle abruptly fell from grace when he was put on trial for the rape and murder of actress Virginia Rappe in 1921. Arbuckle was eventually acquitted, but the scandal overshadowed his legacy as a pioneering comedian and actor in Old Hollywood.

Roman Polanski 

The French-Polish director has been a fugitive from the U.S. criminal justice system since 1978, when he fled America for Poland after being charged with drugging and raping a 13-year old girl. He continued making films in Europe, and in 2003, he earned an Academy Award for Best Director for his World War II drama “The Pianist.” In May, Polanski was expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

OJ Simpson

Once the star of the NFL, Simpson fell from grace when he was arrested and charged with the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman. He was acquitted after one of the most highly publicized trials in American history — 100 million people tuned in to watch the verdict. In 2007, Simpson was arrested and charged with armed robbery and kidnapping, and was sentenced to 33 years in jail. HE was granted parole and released on October 1, 2017.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Donald Trump Jr. Compares Aziz Ansari to Roseanne, Complains 'Rules' Apply 'One Way'

Roseanne Slams James Gunn: 'He's Got All These Tweets About Raping Children' (Video)

Harvey Weinstein Says 'I Love You,' 'Booty Call' Email From Accuser Proves Consensual Relationship

Dave Bautista Says He'll Quit 'Guardians of the Galaxy 3' if Marvel Won't Use James Gunn's Script

'Guardians of the Galaxy' Cast Asks for James Gunn to Be 'Reinstated' as Director

www.thewrap.com | 8/8/18

The culture of Poland is closely connected with its intricate 1000 year history Its unique character developed as a result of its geography at the confluence of various European regions. With origins in the culture of the Proto-Slavs, over time Polish culture has been profoundly influenced by its interweaving ties with the Germanic, Latinate and Byzantine worlds as well as in continual dialog with the many other ethnic groups and minorities living in Poland. The people of Poland have traditionally been seen as hospitable to artists from abroad and eager to follow cultural and artistic trends popular in other countries. In the 19th and 20th centuries the Polish focus on cultural advancement often took precedence over political and economic activity. These factors have contributed to the versatile nature of Polish art, with all its complex nuances. Nowadays, Poland is a highly developed country; however, it retains its traditions.


From dbpedia, under creative commons CC-BY-SA
w3architect.com | hosting p2pweb.net
afromix.org | afromix.info | mediaport.net | webremix.info