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Fox has its own version of NBC’s “American Ninja Warrior,” picking up “Big Bounce Battle,” an obstacle course competition series based on a European format.

The reality competition series will be produced by Endemol Shine North America. Sharon Levy, DJ Nurre and Michael Heyerman will executive produce.

Originally created by Endemol Shine Netherlands and co-developed with Endemol Shine Germany for RTL, “Big Bounce Battle” features trampoline obstacle courses that contestants have to complete as fast as they can. The trampoline tracks become more difficult as the series progresses toward the final where the fastest contestant wins a cash prize.

Also Read: Fox Orders 9 More Episodes of 'The Resident' Season 2

The format made its debut earlier this year, under the name “Big Bounce — Die Trampolin Show,” on Germany’s RTL. TF1 has also commissioned a version of “Big Bounce Battle” in France.

“Big Bounce Battle” joins “Mental Samurai,” “Spin the Wheel” and “The Masked Singer” (also produced by Endemol Shine North America) is new unscripted formats picked up by Fox.

You can get a taste of “Big Bounce Battle” by watching the trailer for the German version below:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox Business and Saudi-Owned Al Arabiya Are Last Media Partners of Saudi Business Conference

'Lethal Weapon' Picked Up for 2 More Episodes at Fox With Damon Wayans

'This Is Us' Star Sterling K. Brown Signs Overall Deal With 20th Century Fox TV

www.thewrap.com | 10/15/18

Thanksgiving is just around the corner in Canada. It's a time of year when the harvest is in, the weather grows colder and families gather to give thanks for all they have.

It is in this moment of gratitude that I want to highlight one of the most valuable and unique offerings in our industry: the ways in which country code top-level domains (ccTLDs) give back. Canadians who choose to use a ccTLD, which for us is .CA, help contribute to investments in the internet community.

CIRA believes that it is important to give back to the internet, whether that be the Canadian internet community or the global internet in which we operate the .CA TLD and participate as a strong contributor. Further, as a not-for-profit organization, CIRA invests its resources into our aspirational goal of building a better online Canada. In fact, we believe so much in this goal that we've invested $6 million dollars over the last five years toward this goal, outside of the investment in our core mandate of bringing .CA to more Canadians and operating a safe, secure and trusted top-level domain.

Many of our ccTLD peers contribute to the internet ecosystem as well. While each organization's program is a little bit different, the intent is the same: to invest in a purpose greater than profit with a return on investment that benefits the communities we serve.

With the exception of a handful of generic TLDs, you won't find this from our more profit-driven peers.

It's a cycle: From community to ccTLD and back

At CIRA, we hold ourselves to high standards in stewarding .CA, which includes providing a safe, secure and stable .CA and underlying domain name system (DNS). We make every effort to provide the best service possible for our customers — .CA holders and others who subscribe to our cybersecurity services.

A portion of the revenue we make, thanks to our customers' trust in us, is funneled back into the Canadian internet community. Here's how:

  • We invest in internet exchange points (IXPs) that provide greater resiliency, data sovereignty and a higher-performing internet in our country. There are 10 IXPs across Canada and we've recently been a catalyst to an additional one in development in the Arctic community of Iqaluit, Nunavut. This will revolutionize the internet there, where right now the community is reliant on satellite connections resulting in slow and expensive internet service.
  • Through our Community Investment Program, we provide grants to organizations across Canada working on the frontlines of the internet. We've contributed $5.45 million over five years through that program. This has included 130 projects from across Canada including one underway now through an organization called Compucorps that will work with Indigenous women to increase their knowledge of website building and online branding to help them engage more in e-commerce. Or the Ragged edge community network stabilization and expansion project that focused on internet infrastructure in Northern Vancouver Island.
  • We're developing and investing in innovative products and services that secure the internet for its users, including our cybersecurity services (our D-Zone suite of products) that keep Canadian schoolchildren safe and add layers of protection to critical healthcare and municipal infrastructure.
  • We encourage Canadians to learn more about their internet by testing its speed and performance through CIRA's Internet Performance Test. There have been over 100,000 tests conducted across the country.
  • We fund, organize and participate in events and forums in Canada and globally where important topics are discussed, which influence internet policy, including an upcoming Canadian Internet Forum, a multistakeholder event being organized for early 2019.

All of that investment improves and expands the internet, gets more Canadians online, safely and securely, and makes it easier and more practical for them to participate in the digital economy. It also creates more opportunities to choose a .CA. Thus, the cycle starts again.

And it's global. We've long shared "giving back" experiences with our European peers — but examples are found around the globe. A recent visit to Brazil showed me a ccTLD highly committed to this cycle of giving back. I was impressed with all they do with their resources and encourage others to learn more from them.

Thanks for making a choice to give back

In Canada, as we gather around the dinner table for our Thanksgiving dinners, I want to give thanks to CIRA's customers for making it possible for our organization to give back. Consumers have more choices than ever when it comes to domain names. They can choose to go with .com or .net, or one of nearly a thousand new domain extensions. But what sets CIRA apart, alongside some of our ccTLD peers, is the determination to give back to the internet ecosystem in our countries. To invest what we earn into a higher purpose.

Thank you to those consumers who chose a ccTLD over others — because of you we're getting closer to a stronger, higher performing and more secure internet every day.

* * *

There are several ccTLDs that give back to the internet community. Here are a few examples.

Sweden: The Internet Foundation in Sweden, IIS invests funds to improve the stability of internet infrastructure in Sweden and to promote internet-focused research, training and education. For example, IIS invested 1 million SEK (about $145,000 CAD) roughly one year ago into Foo Café, a meeting place for developers, which sponsors meetups and events to help developers grow their competence and share knowledge.

Brazil: The Brazilian Internet Steering Committee — a multi-sectoral configuration of 21 members from civil society, the government, the business sector and the academic community — guide the healthy growth of the network in Brazil. One of their initiatives is the Web Technologies Study Center (Ceweb.br), created to help the Brazilian public participate in the global development of the web and public policymaking.

The Netherlands: SIDN not only operates .nl, it also provides funding support to ideas and projects that aim to make the internet stronger or that use the internet in innovative ways. For example, SIDN funded AI for GOOD, a project that aims to use artificial intelligence to improve the world. This online platform presents AI programming challenges to students, start-ups, hackers and developers to solve.

United Kingdom: Nominet funded a granting program for 10 years under the name Nominet Trust. In 2017, that fund began independent operation as the Social Tech Trust and Nominet is now focusing funding on connection, inclusivity and security. For example, they are working with Scouts UK to develop a cybersecurity curriculum and with the Prince's Trust on a digital platform to mentor troubled youth online.

Written by Byron Holland, President and CEO of CIRA

www.circleid.com | 10/4/18
The U.K.’s planned exit from the EU will have a “small” negative impact on the bloc’s economy, although it will prove more damaging to countries such as Ireland, the Netherlands and Belgium that have closer links with Britain, the IMF said.
www.wsj.com | 7/19/18

Discovery and the PGA Tour have struck a massive $2 billion deal for tournament rights outside of the United States through 2030. That’s a lot of green — and we’re not just talking about the putting surfaces.

The pricey (and lengthy) alliance, which tees off next year, will result in about 2,000 hours of content annually and nearly 150 tournaments, including The Players Championship, the FedExCup Playoffs, and the Presidents Cup. It will grant Discovery the exclusive non-U.S. television and multiplatform rights to all PGA Tour golf events by 2024 — here is a timetable for implementation:

Date
Markets
2019
Australia, Canada, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, Spain
2020
Poland, South Korea
2021
Belgium, China, Germany, South Africa
2022
Denmark, Finland, India, Norway, Sweden, UK
2024
France

Also Read: Former 'Deadliest Catch' Skipper Blake Painter Found Dead at 38

About those multiplatform rights: Together, Discovery and the PGA Tour will develop a new PGA Tour-branded OTT video streaming service to serve 220 markets and territories.

“Today is a fantastic day for golf fans around the world as Discovery proudly partners with the PGA Tour to create something that has never been done before,” David Zaslav, president and CEO, Discovery, said. “The long-term partnership between the PGA Tour and Discovery will create the new global Home of Golf, including delivering over 2000 hours of live content year-round and this prestigious sport’s greatest moments, stories and athletes. Following our successful first Olympic Games in PyeongChang, Discovery will contribute its strong global distribution and promotional infrastructure, in-market relationships, global sports expertise with direct-to-consumer platforms and brands to create a valuable new long-term Home of Golf offering in every market outside the U.S.”

“This is an exciting next step for the PGA Tour, which presents a tremendous opportunity to accelerate and expand our media business outside the United States, better service our international broadcast partners, and drive fan growth with a deeply experienced strategic global partner,” added Jay Monahan, commissioner, PGA Tour. “This partnership aligns very well with the opening of PGA Tour offices in London, Tokyo and Beijing in recent years and will support our long-term objectives of growing the game of golf. It also will deliver more value to our sponsors as it presents a tremendous opportunity to engage new and diverse audiences around the world.”

Also Read: Jon Hamm's Impression of Ray Romano Playing Golf Is Simply the Best (Video)

The partnership will be led by Discovery’s Alex Kaplan, who is president and general manager of the new Discovery and PGA Tour venture. His management team will include the PGA Tour’s Thierry Pascal as head of distribution.

Kaplan previously was an executive vice president at Eurosport Digital, where he helped grow the Eurosport D2C business to over 1 million subscribers. Prior to joining Discovery, Kaplan was a senior vice president of global media distribution for the NBA.

“I am incredibly excited to work with David Zaslav and JB Perrette to take international coverage of PGA Tour golf to the next level,” Kaplan said. “We can’t wait to get started and build a world-class global platform and long-term distribution strategy to turn the vision of this partnership into a reality. By joining forces with the outstanding PGA Tour team, led by Jay Monahan and Rick Anderson, we have a unique opportunity to build an amazing product that will serve the fans with the golf content they love on every screen.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Discovery Lost Money in Q1 Due to Huge Scripps Deal

Discovery Boss David Zaslav's Pay Rose Above $42 Million Last Year

Rich Ross Out at Discovery: Company Unveils Post-Scripps Senior Executive Team

www.thewrap.com | 6/4/18
[The Herald] ZIMTRADE, in conjunction with a Netherlands-based organisation PUM, are exploring the possibility of creating a pilot project linking companies in the supply chain so as to demonstrate best business practices in the leather industry. PUM, an organisation of experts that help businesses to thrive and transform lives, is already providing technical advice to players in Zimbabwe's leather value chain.
allafrica.com | 5/28/18
The two nations also discussed science and technology, and health cooperation, Cooperation in the fields of Water, Agriculture and Urban Development, Security cooperation, Economy, Trade & Investment, and Connectivity, Climate Change
www.dnaindia.com | 5/24/18

Data privacy will be among the items topping the agenda at an upcoming Caribbean Internet Governance Forum to be held by the Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU) in Suriname this month.

The meeting is part of an effort by several Caribbean countries to establish and strengthen policies to ensure that Internet users' personal information is collected, shared and used in appropriate ways.

It will take place from May 21 to 23, days before the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force in the European Union on May 25. The GDPR is a regulation on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union. But Caribbean stakeholders are already preparing for the fallout across the region's geopolitical space.

"Although the GDPR comes into effect in Europe, its effect will be felt in the Caribbean, because the region includes Dutch, French and British territories, all of which fall under the EU jurisdiction, and will, therefore, have to comply with the GDPR from as early as May 25, 2018," said Nigel Cassimire, Telecommunications Specialist at the CTU.

Because the GDPR has significant penalties for companies found in violation of its data privacy regulations, the law could adversely affect Caribbean companies doing business with European companies.

"The onus is on European companies doing business with anyone in our region to ensure that whoever they do business with have measures in place that will enable them to remain compliant with the GDPR. For the Caribbean, it is urgent for us to understand what requirements will be placed on us," Cassimire said.

The forum will be held in Suriname, a former colony of the Kingdom of the Netherlands which became an independent nation in 1975.

The agenda will include a range of issues, including service resiliency and network neutrality.

The Caribbean Internet Governance Forum is a multi-stakeholder meeting initiated by the CTU and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat to coordinate a regional approach to Internet Governance. Since its inception in 2005, the forum has met annually and has focused on the formulation of a regional framework for Caribbean Internet governance policy, the proliferation of Internet exchange points, and the growth of Caribbean influence in the global Internet governance arena.

The forum is part of a series of ongoing policy development discussions across the region. Policymakers met in Miami on April 19 to discuss Internet governance issues at a special Caribbean Forum hosted by the CTU and the American Registry for Internet Numbers.

Written by Gerard Best, Development Journalist

www.circleid.com | 5/2/18

After the Brexit vote, I wrote that there could be an impact on EU registrants based in the UK.

Over the past year, the UK government has been engaged in negotiations with the EU to navigate the application of Article 50 and the UK's exit from the European Union. While there has been a lot of focus on issues like the customs union and the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, the eventual departure of the UK from the EU will have a tangible impact on the European digital economy.

In the case of the .eu ccTLD, the situation was unclear. Under the current policies, an individual or organisation needs to have an address in the EU and a couple of neighbouring countries to qualify for registration:

(i) an undertaking having its registered office, central administration or principal place of business within the European Union, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, or

(ii) an organisation established within the European Union, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein without prejudice to the application of national law, or

(iii) a natural person resident within the European Union, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein.

While the UK leaving the EU could be seen as having a clear impact on future registrations of .eu domain names, one would have expected the European Commission not to want to disrupt existing domain names and their registrants. When other domain spaces have updated their policies, they've usually offered some form of "grandfathering" for existing registrations to minimise the negative impact.

However, it appears that the European Commission isn't going to take that approach. In an announcement earlier this week they've made it very clear that they have no intention of allowing existing registrants to keep their EU domain names if they are in the UK.

The document does give a very slight glimmer of hope, but it's only a tiny one. It is hypothetically possible for the UK and EU to reach some form of agreement that would allow for the continued use of .eu domains by UK registrants, but it's looking highly unlikely. Here's the full text of the notice they issued.

As you can see it's highly legalistic and makes lots of references to various bits of legislation and treaties, but the bottom line is summed up in this:

As of the withdrawal date, undertakings and organisations that are established in the United Kingdom but not in the EU and natural persons who reside in the United Kingdom will no longer be eligible to register .eu domain names or, if they are .eu registrants, to renew .eu domain names registered before the withdrawal date.

But what about businesses and individuals in Northern Ireland? Under the Irish constitution they're considered in many realms to be entitled to the same rights and entitlements as Irish citizens and residents:

ARTICLE 2

It is the entitlement and birthright of every person born in the island of Ireland, which includes its islands and seas, to be part of the Irish Nation. That is also the entitlement of all persons otherwise qualified in accordance with law to be citizens of Ireland. Furthermore, the Irish nation cherishes its special affinity with people of Irish ancestry living abroad who share its cultural identity and heritage.

ARTICLE 3

1 It is the firm will of the Irish Nation, in harmony and friendship, to unite all the people who share the territory of the island of Ireland, in all the diversity of their identities and traditions, recognising that a united Ireland shall be brought about only by peaceful means with the consent of a majority of the people, democratically expressed, in both jurisdictions in the island. Until then, the laws enacted by the Parliament established by this Constitution shall have the like area and extent of application as the laws enacted by the Parliament that existed immediately before the coming into operation of this Constitution.

2 Institutions with executive powers and functions that are shared between those jurisdictions may be established by their respective responsible authorities for stated purposes and may exercise powers and functions in respect of all or any part of the island.

Does this mean that businesses and individuals north of the border will lose their .eu domain names, or is there a chance of some form of derogation for them?

How can registrars and their clients lodge their concerns with the EU about this move?

Is EURid in a position to do anything?

At the moment there are more questions than answers, but what is sure is that the options are not looking anyway positive.

According to the most recent EURid quarterly report registrants in the UK account a significant chunk of the .eu registration base and weigh in as the 4th largest country for .eu registrations behind Germany, Netherlands and France:

Wiping out this number of registrations will have a negative impact on the .eu ccTLD as a whole, as well as a negative impact on many European based businesses serving the registrants of the 300 thousand plus names.

Is this unavoidable?

For now, as I mentioned above, there are more questions than answers.

Disclosure: my company is a .eu accredited registrar and I previously served two terms on the .EU Registrar Advisory Board.

Written by Michele Neylon, MD of Blacknight Solutions

www.circleid.com | 3/29/18
[Ghanaian Times] Ghana's large food import bill presently amounts to two million dollars a year, a development which will affect the country's economy without a quick change in policy.
allafrica.com | 3/14/18

There is no doubt that big data is going to be one of the most important tools that will assist human society in the future. Our increasingly complex society has been able to move forward, and it will continue to do so, based on rational, scientific facts and figures within the context of the needs of humanity.

As an example, neuroscience is giving us more insight into ourselves, and we are learning that many of the elements that we have always thought of as being uniquely human are based on neurological/biological processes that can be put into algorithms. The more we know, the more interesting the question is — what makes us human? And, given the progress being made in artificial intelligence (AI), this is an important question.

Society lost touch with its people

We largely still trust that our governments are guiding us through these ever-changing developments, and it must be said that the democratic processes that have ruled us since WWII are very beneficial to mankind. Disputes generally are settled with the assistance of our democratic institutions, using common sense, scientific facts, statistical information and so on.

One could argue that the underlying data and information used in these processes are used for the common good.

However, over the last 30 years, a large proportion of the population has not seen the positive results from their political systems that they had hoped for, and they are now rebelling against politicians who are increasingly using facts and figures for their own political purposes.

Selective use of that information is creating a dangerous breakdown of trust right through our democratic system. And President Trump is going one step further — he is actively undermining several of the institutions that underpin American democracy.

But it is not just government. The Volkswagen car manufacturer scandal in Germany showed a gross misuse of data for the sole purpose of making profit at the expense of the environment. Then there are the blatant intrusions into personal data by intelligence services, social media, etc.

Another very dangerous situation is occurring in China with the introduction of the Citizen Score. This form of mass surveillance and mass manipulation is one of the worst Big Brother-like scenarios that one can imagine.

Despite this misuse of big data, it will have to be reason, facts and statistics that will guide us through the many social, environmental and economic challenges that society is facing. But it is crucial that this takes place within the structures of our democratic principles as well as within our emotional and other 'soft' values.

So far big data has mainly been used for commercial purposes, for sometimes questionable intelligence activities, and for downright criminal activities (hacking, stealing, political interference and so on).

There is an urgent need for big data to be used for the common good. A rapid rebalancing is needed that will see big data being used for the benefit of our society. We shouldn't be put off by its misuse and bury our heads in the sand, hoping it will go away — or, as the new conservative forces in politics would have us believe, that the answer lies in returning to the way things were in 'the good old days'.

Big data for the common good

We should face the big data challenges head-on. Universities in Germany and the Netherlands launched the Data for Humanity Initiative, encouraging people and organisations to use the following principles:

  • Do no harm
  • Use data to help create peaceful coexistence
  • Use data to help vulnerable people and people in need
  • Use data to preserve and improve the natural environment
  • Use data to help create a fair world without discrimination

New regulations and legislation might be needed to ensure that big data is used for the common good, and that it takes privacy and human rights issues equally seriously. At present most of the big data is in the hands of corporations who have shown little interest in the common good; and most of their big data activities are clouded in secrecy and used to gain competitive advantage. Just recently I also mentioned the work of Yuval Nora Harari, who warns of big data dictatorship if we don't get this right.

One of the first critical areas will be healthcare. New medical innovations will make it possible for people to obtain information about potential illnesses they might contract, and personalised big data solutions will be on offer to mitigate this and create better health and lifestyle outcomes.

Personal benefits in the healthcare sector could be enormous, and as a result, people may be less concerned about their personal data. But the reality is that the availability of this information could be used in a positive and a negative way. The latter could lead to discrimination by insurance companies and governments. Also, different cultures might look for different outcomes — what leeway will there be for them?

With predictive analytics and complex algorithms, allowance must be made for error, and there needs to be a system of fairness in place to guide this.

What this all means is that a key principle should be for the ownership of all personal data to rest with the individual person, and that they can decide to share that information, or not, on a permission-based footing.

We have been recommending the above approach for the last two decades (but, I must say, without much success).

I can see situations where an opt-out rather than an opt-in system could be a more effective or efficient option, but that would necessitate a restoration of trust in the political system that guides such decisions.

Rather than relying on the organisations that are currently leading the development of big data (Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc), we should encourage the national statistical institutions to start looking at big data that can help guide us through the myriad issues we are facing.

It is, of course, vital that these national institutions be based on democratic principles, and that they are not used for party political reasons. At present, the Trump government is looking at how they can use census data for the benefit of their own party politics. If this happens, we are one step closer to a very dangerous decline in our democracy.

Bureaus of Statistics were a result of the Enlightenment

Interestingly, many of our democratic institutions started their life in the 19th century as a consequence of the Enlightenment, when there was a new drive towards rational politics, scientific, social and economic developments. This needed to be underpinned by a framework of national measurements. The first National Bureau of Statistics was established in Paris in 1800. Over the last 200 years these institutions, which are now established in every country, have looked after uniformity in data collection, data integration, and data analytics, supported by a large group of independent and trusted data experts involved in interpreting the data that guided policy decisions for the benefit of all.

The effects of the Enlightenment have been enormous; and they are still being delivered. There are now more democratic countries than ever before; overall global poverty keeps decreasing; literacy keeps increasing; wars and the number of people killed in wars continue to decline; and average lifestyle around the globe keeps improving. We need to ensure that this upwards trend continues.

The philosopher Immanuel Kant, key person in what we might want to call the modern Enlightenment, described (in 1784) Enlightenment as follows:

'Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one's understanding without guidance from another.'

We most certainly have that ability to think for ourselves, and it is our responsibility as human beings to do so at a time when fake news, lies and other forces are trying to undermine our democratic values and principles. If we don't stand up to these undermining forces they will cause extensive damage.

Decentralisation of facts and figures

A key problem now is that since many people no longer believe they are receiving positive social and economic outcomes they have ceased to trust the underlying data and are reverting to emotions, vague memories of a much better past, and imaginary futures.

While the statistical information that governments collected and used was certainly correct at macro-levels (levels of poverty, migration, GDP, unemployment, etc.), people live in micro-environments, and there the 'facts and figures' were quite different. And not just between national and local situations — importantly, there are great differences in facts and figures within towns, suburbs, rural regions and so on.

Differences within communities are significantly more complex than they were when these institutions were first established, and data collection began.

National governments unwilling to accept this level of criticism from their people will continue to lose trust. People don't live in some artificial place as the national average — they live in real communities with real problems and issues which are not necessarily reflected in national facts and figures.

It has become clear that for our society to move forward, its governance needs to be more decentralised and that all of us need to participate in that process. And technology can assist us here.

Big data in connected cities

This also fits in with the understanding that cities need much better data to run their communities. There are great opportunities to win political trust back at these local levels. A key issue here is that this spatial decentralisation needs to be supported by functional decentralisation, so that cities, regions, and provinces have the autonomy enabling them to successfully address the local issues of education, healthcare, environment, jobs, economy, mobility, etc. Furthermore, a decentralisation of political systems and institutions is needed to assist these developments.

This does not mean that big data is not needed at a national level as well. It is equally essential there; but they, too, will need to decentralise. The National Bureaus of Statistics should be the nations' leaders in big data for the common good, and they should not be used for party politics if they want to retain the position of trust that they currently still enjoy. But they will need to work far more closely with cities to better reflect the facts and figures of local communities.

The leading smart cities understand the need for these news structures. Councils of Mayors are becoming a new political force. Cities already have vast amounts of data that can be used to improve their local situations. However, to maximise the use of big data for the common good of their citizens a breakdown of the many (data) silos within their bureaucracies will be necessary. Little ivory towers where security, safety, and privacy issues are used to stop the data from being used in a broader and more open context.

An early lesson learned by smart city pioneers was that it is not about open slather data; it is about open data in a controlled environment.

Actively involving the local citizens in the various 'smart city' projects is critical and can generate further data relevant to their local situation. There are already some good examples in some of the leading smart cities.

Emotional and sentimental data

An emerging development is the taking of 'emotional' or 'sentimental' data analytics into account. We see this happening already in the commercial sphere (Facebook produced some interesting data reflecting emotional trends but was vilified for it, and as a result this form of data in now shrouded in secrecy — a very bad outcome indeed).

Another example is Cambridge Analytica — on whose board sits Steven Bannon. They developed psychological profiles for the Trump campaign and, again, great secrecy here also. Despite its potential little is happening so far in the public sphere in relation to the common good. Again, cities and communities could be a much better starting point for exploration of these softer data options, rather than the nation as a whole.

Big data is a far too important a development to be left just in the hands of commercial or 'secret' organisations. Cities that already have a holistic strategy in place could take a leadership role here. Within such a plan they will already have a data strategy in place and over time other cities and communities can learn from them and follow in their footsteps. Like trusted national statistical organisations, at a city level also we need professional statisticians and big data analysts who are able to make unambiguous and objective observations about their local economy and local community.

Written by Paul Budde, Managing Director of Paul Budde Communication

www.circleid.com | 2/28/18

On the Index of Economic Freedom, the Netherlands is the 13th most laissez-faire capitalist economy out of 157 surveyed countries. At the time of writing the Netherlands is the 16th largest economy of the world. Between 1998 and 2000 annual economic growth averaged nearly 4%, well above the European average. Growth slowed considerably in 2001-05 as part of the global economic slowdown. 2006 however, showed a promising 2.9% growth. Yearly growth accelerated to 4.2% in the third quarter of 2007. Inflation is 1.3% and is expected to stay low at about 1.5% in the coming years. The Netherlands is a founding member of the European Union, the OECD and the World Trade Organization


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