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ELS'19 - 12th European Lisp Symposium Hotel Bristol Palace Genova, Italy April 1-2 2019 In cooperation with: ACM SIGPLAN In co-location with 2019 Sponsored by EPITA and Franz Inc. http://www.european-lisp-symposium.org/ Recent news: - Submission deadline extended to Friday February 8. - Keynote abstracts now available. - registration now open: https://2019.programming-conference.org/attending/Registration - Student refund program after the conference. The purpose of the European Lisp Symposium is to provide a forum for the discussion and dissemination of all aspects of design, implementation and application of any of the Lisp and Lisp-inspired dialects, including Common Lisp, Scheme, Emacs Lisp, AutoLisp, ISLISP, Dylan, Clojure, ACL2, ECMAScript, Racket, SKILL, Hop and so on. We encourage everyone interested in Lisp to participate. The 12th European Lisp Symposium invites high quality papers about novel research results, insights and lessons learned from practical applications and educational perspectives. We also encourage submissions about known ideas as long as they are presented in a new setting and/or in a highly elegant way. Topics include but are not limited to: - Context-, aspect-, domain-oriented and generative programming - Macro-, reflective-, meta- and/or rule-based development approaches - Language design and implementation - Language integration, inter-operation and deployment - Development methodologies, support and environments - Educational approaches and perspectives - Experience reports and case studies We invite submissions in the following forms: Papers: Technical papers of up to 8 pages that describe original results or explain known ideas in new and elegant ways. Demonstrations: Abstracts of up to 2 pages for demonstrations of tools, libraries, and applications. Tutorials: Abstracts of up to 4 pages for in-depth presentations about topics of special interest for at least 90 minutes and up to 180 minutes. The symposium will also provide slots for lightning talks, to be registered on-site every day. All submissions should be formatted following the ACM SIGS guidelines and include ACM Computing Classification System 2012 concepts and terms. Submissions should be uploaded to Easy Chair, at the following address: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=els2019 Note: to help us with the review process please indicate the type of submission by entering either "paper", "demo", or "tutorial" in the Keywords field. Important dates: - 08 Feb 2019 Submission deadline (*** extended! ***) - 01 Mar 2019 Notification of acceptance - 18 Mar 2019 Final papers due - 01-02 Apr 2019 Symposium Programme chair: Nicolas Neuss, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany Programme committee: Marco Antoniotti, Universita Milano Bicocca, Italy Marc Battyani, FractalConcept, France Pascal Costanza, IMEC, ExaScience Life Lab, Leuven, Belgium Leonie Dreschler-Fischer, University of Hamburg, Germany R. Matthew Emerson, thoughtstuff LLC, USA Marco Heisig, FAU, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany Charlotte Herzeel, IMEC, ExaScience Life Lab, Leuven, Belgium Pierre R. Mai, PMSF IT Consulting, Germany Breanndán Ó Nualláin, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands François-René Rideau, Google, USA Alberto Riva, Unversity of Florida, USA Alessio Stalla, ManyDesigns Srl, Italy Patrick Krusenotto, Deutsche Welle, Germany Philipp Marek, Austria Sacha Chua, Living an Awesome Life, Canada Search Keywords: #els2019, ELS 2019, ELS '19, European Lisp Symposium 2019, European Lisp Symposium '19, 12th ELS, 12th European Lisp Symposium, European Lisp Conference 2019, European Lisp Conference '19
Canada-born with roots in Uruguay, Croatia and Argentina, Katherine Jerkovic split her childhood between Belgium and Uruguay. At 18, she settled in Montreal and studied film at Concordia University. After a few shorts (“The Winter’s Keeper”) and some video-installations, she has finished her first feature, “Roads in February.” The film is a co-production between Nicolas […]
variety.com | 12/13/18

At just around midnight in the capital of Romania, film producer Ada Solomon got a call that threatened the life of her entire movie. Her docu-drama depicting a reenactment of one of the worst atrocities in Romania’s history was going to be shut down by the town’s vice mayor. And there was nothing she could do to stop it.

“I had, for one hour and a half, in the middle of [Revolution Square], the most horrible discussion I ever had in my life,” Solomon told TheWrap’s Steve Pond at a Q&A on Thursday following a screening of “I Do Not Care If We Go Down In History as Barbarians,” a film about the 1941 mass murder of tens of thousands of Jews on the Eastern Front by Romanian forces.

“Barbarians,” Romania’s entry into the Oscar foreign film race, follows theater director Mariana (Ioana Iacob) as she prepares a reenactment that will hopefully bring awareness to a truth not many Romanians have come to terms with, according to Solomon. Before Romania fought against Germany in World War II, the country worked alongside Germany to advance their ethnic cleansing agenda. Romanians who acknowledge that fact are chastised for being unpatriotic.

Also Read: 'I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians' Takes Top Honor at Karlovy Vary

During that fateful night of shooting, Solomon and director Radu Jude immediately presented all their papers and permits stating they were allowed to film in the heart of Bucharest. But it wasn’t the proof that got the vice mayor to bite. In fact, it was a misunderstanding that saved the movie.

“You don’t have to thank me,” the vice mayor told her after letting them resume filming. “If this wasn’t a film about [former Romanian Prime Minister Ion Antonescu], you wouldn’t have the permit”

Except it wasn’t about Antonescu at all. At least not in a good way. In 1946, Antonescu would go on to be charged for war crimes due to his involvement with Nazi Germany and the mass murder of Jews.

“It’s a kind of injustice with the lack of education about this,” Solomon told the audience at the Landmark Theatre. “This is a white page in the history book. The debate has to be there.”

The dissonance between what happened and what Romanians are led to believe has resulted in people in the other countries that have screened the film (“Barbarians” has premiered in France, Belgium and Canada, among others) to relate with the corrective history going on.

“I don’t remember what I’ve learned,” Romanian-born actress Iacob told the audience about learning of the massacre in high school. “Maybe it was one page in the history book. If you weren’t there for the lesson, you wouldn’t have known it.”

Also Read: 'Family First' Director Details Making of Crime Drama Where 'Love Is the Winner'

Aside from directing, Jude also penned the script. Solomon said Jude always had someone like Iacob in mind to play the lead role, wanting “a feminine figure to oppose the world of men.”

Mariana is depicted in the film as someone constantly negotiating with men trying to flirt their way into getting what they want. But Mariana always pushes back.

During a lengthy scene between Mariana and a city official, played by actor Alexandru Dabija, for example, Mariana has to fight to keep her theatrical production uncensored while also dodging the official’s attempts to compliment her into submission. The same can be seen with Mariana’s intimate relationship with an older pilot, a married man with whom she’s having an affair. Mariana informs him at one point that she is pregnant with his baby. During one spat, the pilot implores her that it is her duty to abort the baby so he doesn’t get in trouble.

She doesn’t budge.

Also Read: 'Roma,' 'Cold War' Lead Academy's List of 87 Films in the Oscars Foreign Language Race

Iacob came in for a one-on-one audition with Jude for the role of Mariana. From that moment, Iacob fell in love with the character and the story Jude was trying to tell.

“I read the pages for the casting sessions, and I couldn’t stop,” Iacob said.

After getting everyone on board, the production took 22 days. It was a quick shoot, sure, but not one without its dissenters. Solomon described getting scathing messages from Romanians asking “How dare they” and that they were “bad Romanians.”

But Jude and Solomon always kept going, believing the film would become “a cultural product” that could help people understand why it’s important to acknowledge the event happened.

“We are not politicians. But we are using our tools — the art — to express how we feel about the world around us,” Solomon said.

So does Solomon think the Bucharest vice mayor has seen the film he so abruptly detested on that late night?

“I doubt it,” she joked.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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'RBG' and 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' Among 166 Documentaries Submitted for Oscars

www.thewrap.com | 11/16/18

Education in Belgium is regulated and for the larger part financed by one of the three communities. The national legislator only kept a very few, minimal competences for education as the age for mandatory schooling, and, indirectly, the financing of the communities. All the three communities have a unified school system, with small differences between the different communities. The schools can be divided in three groups: Schools owned by the communities (GO! Onderwijs van de Vlaamse gemeenschap; réseau de la Communauté française) Subsidized public schools (officieel gesubsidieerd onderwijs; réseau officiel subventionné), organized by provinces and municipalities Subsidized free schools (vrij gesubsidieerd onderwijs; réseau libre subventionné), mainly organized by an organization affiliated to the Catholic church The latter is the largest group, both in number of schools and in number of pupils. Education in Belgium is compulsory between the ages of 6 and 18. Private home education is possible, and the numbers are rising slowly. For the year 2005—2006 the number of home schooled children in Flanders rose to 580 out of a total of 1 million. In the 2003 PISA-study by the OECD, the Belgian students scored relatively high. The results of the Dutch-speaking students were significantly higher than the scores of the German-speaking students which were in turn significantly higher than the French-speaking students.


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