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Finland Education

In Finland schools are increasingly ditching traditional classrooms in favour of open-plan learning.
www.bbc.co.uk | 11/6/18

Globalisation has increased competition in world economies and transcended educational systems across the globe – Sahlberg, 2006. An analysis of Finland and Singapore – two countries with renowned...

www.nationnews.com | 10/3/18
Researchers from the University of Turku in Finland and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin used detailed records kept by local governments on animal husbandry.
Scientists at the universities of Bristol, Jyväskylä and Eastern Finland conducted the review of 70 studies on the health outcomes of saunas, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The Finnish education system is an egalitarian Nordic system, with no tuition fees and with free meals served to full-time students. The present Finnish education system consists of well-funded and carefully thought out daycare programs (for babies and toddlers) and a one-year "pre-school" (or kindergarten for six-year olds); a nine-year compulsory basic comprehensive school (starting at age seven and ending at the age of sixteen); post-compulsory secondary general academic and vocational education; higher education (University and Polytechnical); and adult (lifelong, continuing) education. The Nordic strategy for achieving equality and excellence in education has been based on constructing a publicly funded comprehensive school system without selecting, tracking, or streaming students during their common basic education. Part of the strategy has been to spread the school network so that pupils have a school near their homes whenever possible or, if this is not feasible, e.g. in rural areas, to provide free transportation to more widely dispersed schools. Inclusive special education within the classroom and instructional efforts to minimize low achievement are also typical of Nordic educational systems. After their nine-year basic education in a comprehensive school, students at the age of 16 may choose to continue their secondary education in either an academic track or a vocational track (ammattikoulu), both of which usually take three years. Tertiary education is divided into university and polytechnic (ammattikorkeakoulu, often translated into English as "university of applied sciences") systems. Only universities award licentiate- and doctoral-level degrees. Formerly, only university graduates could obtain higher (postgraduate) degrees, however, since the implementation of the Bologna process, polytechnic degree holders can now qualify for further academic study by doing additional courses. There are 20 universities and 30 polytechnics in the country. The Education Index, published with the UN's Human Development Index in 2008, based on data from 2006, lists Finland as 0.993, amongst the highest in the world, tied for first with Denmark, Australia and New Zealand.


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