Français | English | Español | Português

Sweden Education

A radioactive isotope one billion times older than the Universe! An international team of researchers, including six scientists from the Faculty of Science and Technology of the University of Coimbra (FCTUC), was able to measure for the first time the longest average lifetime of a radioactive isotope recorded by a device of measurement. This extraordinary fact is published (April 25), as the main piece on the cover, in Nature, the most prestigious of all scientific journals. The isotope in question is Xe 124 and its average lifetime is approximately one billion times older than the Universe. The Universe is about 14 billion years old, a period of time inconceivable when compared to the scale of human life. As if that alone did not cause enough amazement, there are radioactive isotopes (unstable elements that change over time emitting radiation) whose average life happens on scales much greater than the existence of the Universe itself. "The fact that we can directly measure such a rare process as this demonstrates the extraordinary scope of our measurement system, even when it was not made to measure these events, but rather dark matter," stresses José Matias, coordinator of the Portuguese team in this effort international and researcher of the Laboratory of Instrumentation, Biomedical Engineering and Radiation Physics (LIBPhys) of FCTUC. In fact, this measurement was only possible thanks to the XENON1T system, the most sensitive instrument ever produced by mankind for the detection of dark matter. It is installed in the National Laboratory of Gran Sasso (Italy), the largest underground laboratory in the world, under 1300 meters of rock to shield the system from cosmic rays existing on the surface. The study published by Nature shows that, after all, "XENON1T was also able to measure other rare physical phenomena, such as double electronic capture. In this case, the nucleus captures two of the electrons that orbit it in the atom, transforming two of the protons that constituted it into neutrons and emitting radiation in the form of two neutrinos. The energy released in this process forms the signal that the system registers, despite the extreme difficulty in being detected by its rarity, and can be generally masked by the omnipresent "normal" radiation ", affirms the also vice president of the Higher Institute of Engineering of Coimbra (ISEC). The average life span of Xe 124 Only with the detailed knowledge of the sources of radiation recorded by the detector was it possible to observe 126 events of double electron capture of the isotope Xe 124 and thus to determine for the first time its average life time of 2.5 x 1022 years (25 thousand millions of billions of years). This is the longest physical process ever measured directly by mankind. In fact, there is a register of phenomena with a longer average life (isotope Te 128) in the Universe, but that was inferred indirectly from another process. For the time being, it is not possible to predict the implications of this discovery that opens new horizons in human knowledge. The XENON consortium consists of 160 scientists from 27 research groups from the US, Germany, Portugal, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, Japan, Israel and Abu Dhabi. Portugal has been a partner in this collaboration since its inception in 2005 through the LIBPhys team. Cristina Pinto University of Coimbra • Faculty of Science and Technology Translated from the Portuguese version Ekaterina Santos

Despite an extremely eventful week in the world of American politics, “SNL” opted to open its latest episode with a sketch about Lori Loughlin, Michael Avenatti and Julian Assange being in prison together. Assange was played by Michael Keaton in a surprise appearance, with “SNL” regular Kate McKinnon as Laughlin and Pete Davidson as Avenatti.

The sketch eased into their introduction, started with three inmates talking about what they did to end up in prison.

“I’m the craziest dude in here,” said “SNL” cast member Kenan Thompson. “I stabbed my neighborhood to death and then ate his fingers so they couldn’t ID the body.”

Also Read: Boston Globe Unpublishes Column Suggesting That Servers 'Tamper' With Trump Officials' Food

“Oh, yeah? You think that’s insane?” McKinnon, as Loughlin, said as she came in from offscreen. “I paid 500 grand to get my daughter into USC.”

The other inmates were increasingly taken aback by this declaration, and were increasingly appalled as Loughlin explained the many other pointless things she blew money on.

Davidson as Avenatti was introduced next, with Keaton as Assange coming in last.

“It’s me. I’m the architect of anarchy. I’m the king of chaos. I’m the scourge of the cleaning staff at the Ecuadorian embassy,” said Keaton/Avenatti.

“Yeah? What’s the big deal? Old man doesn’t look so tough,” “SNL” cast member Kyle Mooney said, not recognizing Assange.

Also Read: Fox News, Fox Business Retract Lou Dobbs' Comments About Trump's 'Soaring' Approval Ratings

“You want to throw down, amigo?” Keaton’s Assange replied.”You want to? I hope you’re proud of every single photo in your iPod because, boom, all your ding dong pics just went on the internet.”

Mooney’s character scoffed at this.

“Hey, you remember that notes folder you had? What was that called? ‘Ideas for Shark Tank’?

“How did you know about that?” Mooney asked.

Also Read: James Corden Rap-Recaps 7 Seasons of 'Game of Thrones' in 3 Minutes (Video)

“I know everything, baby,” Keaton’s Assange said. “You sons of bitches want to hear how crazy I am? Here’s how crazy I am. I’m wanted in the US and Sweden. I’m from Australia. I live in London, in Ecuador. You try figuring that one out. Yeah, you cheat your schools and, you know, you rob your companies. That’s cute. It is, yeah. I’ve attacked the U.S. military, bitches, because I’m an actual James Bond super villain and I’m one step away from destroying the goddamn moon. So you want to get nuts? Come on, let’s get nuts.”

That last bit was a reference to Keaton’s 1989 blockbuster “Batman.”

Watch some of it below:

“You wanna get nuts? C’mon. Let’s get nuts.” #SNL pic.twitter.com/GyiftiTHAS

— Saturday Night Live – SNL (@nbcsnl) April 14, 2019

Related stories from TheWrap:

Pamela Anderson Denounces UK After Julian Assange Arrest: 'You Are America's Bitch'

Watch Julian Assange's Arrest as He's Pulled Out of Ecuador's London Embassy (Video)

WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange Arrested in London

www.thewrap.com | 4/14/19

James (Jon) Castle - 7 December 1950 to 12 January 2018

Over four decades Captain Jon Castle navigated Greenpeace ships by the twin stars of ‘right and wrong’, defending the environment and promoting peace. Greenpeace chronicler, Rex Weyler, recounts a few of the stories that made up an extraordinary life.

Captain Jon Castle onboard the MV Sirius, 1 May 1996

James (Jon) Castle first opened his eyes virtually at sea. He was born 7 December 1950 in Cobo Bay on the Channel Island of Guernsey, UK. He grew up in a house known locally as Casa del Mare, the closest house on the island to the sea, the second son of Robert Breedlove Castle and Mary Constance Castle. 

Young Jon Castle loved the sea and boats. He worked on De Ile de Serk, a cargo boat that supplied nearby Sark island, and he studied at the University of Southampton to become an officer in the Merchant Navy. 

Jon became a beloved skipper of Greenpeace ships. He sailed on many campaigns and famously skippered two ships during Greenpeace’s action against Shell’s North Sea oil platform, Brent Spar. During his activist career, Jon spelt his name as "Castel" to avoid unwanted attention on his family.

Right and wrong

Jon had two personal obsessions: he loved books and world knowledge and was extremely well-read.  He also loved sacred sites and spent personal holidays walking to stone circles, standing stones, and holy wells.  

As a young man, Jon became acquainted with the Quaker tradition, drawn by their dedication to peace, civil rights, and direct social action. In 1977, when Greenpeace purchased their first ship - the Aberdeen trawler renamed, the Rainbow Warrior - Jon signed on as first mate, working with skipper Peter Bouquet and activists Susi Newborn, Denise Bell and Pete Wilkinson.

In 1978, Wilkinson and Castle learned of the British government dumping radioactive waste at sea in the deep ocean trench off the coast of Spain in the Sea of Biscay. In July, the Rainbow Warrior followed the British ship, Gem, south from the English coast, carrying a load of toxic, radioactive waste barrels. The now-famous confrontation during which the Gem crew dropped barrels onto a Greenpeace inflatable boat, ultimately changed maritime law and initiated a ban on toxic dumping at sea.

After being arrested by Spanish authorities, Castle and Bouquet staged a dramatic escape from La Coru?a harbour at night, without running lights, and returned the Greenpeace ship to action. Crew member Simone Hollander recalls, as the ship entered Dublin harbour in 1978, Jon cheerfully insisting that the entire crew help clean the ship's bilges before going ashore, an action that not only built camaraderie among the crew, but showed a mariner's respect for the ship itself. In 1979, they brought the ship to Amsterdam and participated in the first Greenpeace International meeting.

In 1980 Castle and the Rainbow Warrior crew confronted Norwegian and Spanish whaling ships, were again arrested by Spanish authorities, and brought into custody in the El Ferrol naval base.

The Rainbow Warrior remained in custody for five months, as the Spanish government demanded 10 million pesetas to compensate the whaling company. On the night of November 8, 1980, the Rainbow Warrior, with Castle at the helm, quietly escaped the naval base, through the North Atlantic, and into port in Jersey.

In 1995, Castle skippered the MV Greenpeace during the campaign against French nuclear testing in the Pacific and led a flotilla into New Zealand to replace the original Rainbow Warrior that French agents bombed in Auckland in 1985.

Over the years, Castle became legendary for his maritime skills, courage, compassion, commitment, and for his incorruptible integrity. "Environmentalism: That does not mean a lot to me," he once said, "I am here because of what is right and wrong. Those words are good enough for me."

Brent Spar   Action at Brent Spar Oil Rig in the North Sea, 16 June 1995

One of the most successful Greenpeace campaigns of all time began in the summer of 1995 when Shell Oil announced a plan to dump a floating oil storage tank, containing toxic petroleum residue, into the North Atlantic. Castle signed on as skipper of the Greenpeace vessel Moby Dick, out of Lerwick, Scotland. A month later, on 30 April 1995, Castle and other activists occupied the Brent Spar and called for a boycott of Shell service stations.

When Shell security and British police sprayed the protesters with water cannons, images flooded across world media, demonstrations broke out across Europe, and on May 15, at the G7 summit, German chancellor Helmut Kohl publicly protested to British Prime Minister John Major. In June, 11 nations, at the Oslo and Paris Commission meetings, called for a moratorium on sea disposal of offshore installations.

After three weeks, British police managed to evict Castle and the other occupiers and held them briefly in an Aberdeen jail. When Shell and the British government defied public sentiment and began towing the Spar to the disposal site, consumers boycotted Shell stations across Europe. Once released, Castle took charge of the chartered Greenpeace vessel Altair and continued to pursue the Brent Spar towards the dumping ground. Castle called on the master of another Greenpeace ship, fitted with a helideck, to alter course and rendezvous with him. Using a helicopter, protesters re-occupied the Spar and cut the wires to the detonators of scuppering charges.

One of the occupiers, young recruit Eric Heijselaar, recalls: "One of the first people I met as I climbed on board was a red-haired giant of a man grinning broadly at us. My first thought was that he was a deckhand, or maybe the bosun. So I asked if he knew whether a cabin had been assigned to me yet. He gave me a lovely warm smile, and reassured me that, yes, a cabin had been arranged. At dinner I found out that he was Jon Castle, not a deckhand, not the bosun, but the captain. And what a captain!"

With activists occupying the Spar once again, Castle and the crew kept up their pursuit when suddenly the Spar altered course, heading towards Norway. Shell had given up. The company announced that Brent Spar would be cleaned out and used as a foundation for a new ferry terminal. Three years later, in 1998, the Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR) passed a ban on dumping oil installations into the North Sea.

"There was no question among the crew who had made this possible, who had caused this to happen," Heijselaar recalls. "It was Jon Castle. His quiet enthusiasm and the trust he put into people made this crew one of the best I ever saw. He always knew exactly what he wanted out of a campaign, how to gain momentum, and he always found the right words to explain his philosophies. He was that rare combination, both a mechanic and a mystic. And above all he was a very loving, kind human being."

Moruroa

After the Brent Spar campaign, Castle returned to the South Pacific on the Rainbow Warrior II, to obstruct a proposed French nuclear test in the Moruroa atoll. Expecting the French to occupy their ship, Castle and engineer, Luis Manuel Pinto da Costa, rigged the steering mechanism to be controlled from the crow's-nest. When French commandos boarded the ship, Castle stationed himself in the crow's-nest, cut away the access ladder and greased the mast so that the raiders would have difficulty arresting him.

Eventually, the commandos cut a hole into the engine-room and severed cables controlling the engine, radio, and steering mechanism, making Castle's remote control system worthless. They towed the Rainbow Warrior II to the island of Hao, as three other protest vessels arrived. 

Three thousand demonstrators gathered in the French port of Papeete, demanding that France abandon the tests. Oscar Temaru - leader of Tavini Huiraatira, an anti-nuclear, pro-independence party - who had been aboard the Rainbow Warrior II when it was raided, welcomed anti-testing supporters from Britain, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, Sweden, Canada, Germany, Brazil, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, the Philippines, and American Samoa. Eventually, France ended their tests, and atmospheric nuclear testing in the world's oceans stopped once and for all.

“Moral courage”

Through these extraordinary missions, Jon Castle advocated "self-reflection" not only for individual activists, but for the organisation that he loved. Activists, Castle maintained, required "moral courage." He cautioned, "Don't seek approval. Someone has to be way out in front... illuminating territory in advance of the main body of thought."

He opposed "corporatism" in activist organisations and urged Greenpeace to avoid becoming "over-centralised or compartmentalised."  He felt that activist decisions should emerge from the actions themselves, not in an office. We can't fight industrialism with "money, numbers, and high-tech alone," he once wrote in a personal manifesto. Organisations have to avoid traps of "self-perpetuation" and focus on the job "upsetting powerful forces, taking on multinationals and the military-industrial complex."

He recalled that Greenpeace had become popular "because a gut message came through to the thirsty hearts of poor suffering people ... feeling the destruction around them."  Activists, Castle felt, required "freedom of expression, spontaneity [and] an integrated lifestyle."  An activist organisation should foster a "feeling of community" and exhibit "moral courage." Castle felt that social change activists had to "question the materialistic, consumerist lifestyle that drives energy overuse, the increasingly inequitable world economic tyranny that creates poverty and drives environmental degradation," and must maintain "honour, courage and the creative edge."

Well loved hero

Susi Newborn, who was there to welcome Jon aboard the Rainbow Warrior way back in 1977, and who gave the ship its name, wrote about her friend with whom she felt "welded at the heart: He was a Buddhist and a vegetarian and had an earring in his ear. He liked poetry and classical music and could be very dark, but also very funny. Once, I cut his hair as he downed a bottle or two of rum reciting The Second Coming by Yeats."

Newborn recalls Castle insisting that women steer the ships in and out of port because, "they got it right, were naturals." She recalls a night at sea, Castle "lashed to the wheel facing one of the biggest storms of last century head on. I was flung about my cabin like a rag doll until I passed out. We never talked about the storm, as if too scared to summon up the behemoth we had encountered. A small handwritten note pinned somewhere in the mess, the sole acknowledgment of a skipper to his six-person crew: ‘Thank You.’” Others remember Castle as the Greenpeace captain that could regularly be found in the galley doing kitchen duty.

In 2008, with the small yacht Musichana, Castle and Pete Bouquet staged a two-man invasion of Diego Garcia island to protest the American bomber base there and the UK's refusal to allow evicted Chagos Islanders to return to their homes. They anchored in the lagoon and radioed the British Indian Ocean Territories officials on the island to tell them they and the US Air Force were acting in breach of international law and United Nations resolutions. When arrested, Castle politely lectured his captors on their immoral and illegal conduct.

In one of his final actions, as he battled with his failing health, Castle helped friends in Scotland operate a soup kitchen, quietly prepping food and washing up behind the scenes.  

Upon hearing of his passing, Greenpeace ships around the world - the Arctic Sunrise, the Esperanza, and the Rainbow Warrior - flew their flags at half mast.

Jon is fondly remembered by his brother David, ex-wife Caroline, their son, Morgan Castle, born in 1982, and their daughter, Eowyn Castle, born in 1984. Morgan has a daughter of eight months Flora, and and Eowyn has a daughter, Rose, who is 2.   

The six-minute training montage in “Creed II” was a chance for composer Ludwig Göransson to make a “big statement” with his music. Göransson needed to work within the constraints and themes on both the original “Creed,” which he also composed, and the iconic “Rocky” theme music, while giving the audience something new and epic.

“I’m always trying to experiment and come up with new palettes of sound and new combinations of music that you haven’t really seen or heard in film before,” Göransson told TheWrap. “I’m just constantly figuring out new ways to reinvent myself. And if it’s combining ’70s jazz with Puccini and 808 drums, I’ll try that.”

And the result? Göransson put together a grandiose composition that marries modern hip-hop production with a traditional string orchestra and even a hint of ’70s jazz instrumentation as a nod to the original film. Hearing it as Michael B. Jordan furiously digs into a barren desert is a clear indicator of how Göransson’s willingness to take risks and blend genres separates him from some of his less sonically ambitious contemporaries.

Also Read: 'Creed II,' 'Ralph Breaks the Internet' Set Record Thanksgiving Preview Grosses

Born in Sweden, Göransson’s background is in classical music, with early influences touching on everything from Metallica to Pat Metheny to Wes Montgomery. Since moving to the U.S. 10 years ago, he has also worked with Vince Staples, Chance the Rapper, HAIM and most notably, Childish Gambino. Within months of meeting Donald Glover as the composer on “Community,” the two collaborated on Childish Gambino’s 2010 mixtape, “Culdesac.”

Though Göransson originally had little background within hip-hop, working closely with Glover has, in turn, shaped his sound as a composer.

“It opened up my mind for that genre, made me interested in that, and it made me interested in getting better. That was extremely helpful in terms of crafting my sound and how my sound is today,” Göransson said. “It’s about really studying and doing research and learning as much as you can from each genre.”

Also Read: 'Black Panther' Composer Set to Score Sony's Marvel Movie 'Venom'

Having moved to the U.S. to attend the University of Southern California, one of Göransson’s first American friends in his program was Ryan Coogler. The two shot pool together and had a mutual love of movies and music.

“He was telling me about all these Swedish artists that he loved like Little Dragon and The Knife,” Göransson’s said. “And I was like, ‘How do you know about Lykke Li?'”

Since then, Göransson has composed the score on each of Coogler’s films, including Coogler’s early shorts at USC and this year’s “Black Panther.”

Also Read: Ryan Coogler to Write and Direct 'Black Panther' Sequel

Göransson’s challenge on “Black Panther” was to capture traditional African music and combine it with a modern, grand cinematic sound. He spent time studying African influences and musicians, and mashed-up Senegalese talking drums and other instruments not commonly heard in the Western world with 808 beats and percussive motifs.

As Göransson was researching the film’s African influences, he was working with Glover on Childish Gambino’s “This is America.” The two had been working on the track for as long as three years, and if you listen closely, you can hear echoes of the themes for T’Challa in its Afro-funk rhythms and beats, and vice-versa.

However, it was the music video directed by Hiro Murai that for Göransson, not unlike everyone else when they first saw the video, made the track come alive.

Also Read: How 'Atlanta' and 'This Is America' Director Hiro Murai Mashes Up Comedy and Horror

“Now I really understand what this song is about,” Göransson said of seeing the clip. “I had never worked on something like that before, a song and a video and message connected like that. I had no idea it was going to get so popular. I’ve been telling people about Childish Gambino for 10 years, and the people that I thought would least listen to it were calling me up, ‘Oh man I love Childish Gambino. I love this new song.’ OK, I told you about this 10 years ago.”

Göransson is a potential Oscar contender for his score on “Black Panther,” and he hopes to score the blockbuster’s sequel, which is also directed by his pal Coogler. But until then, he’s thankful that the movie’s reach exposed the world to a wider array of musical styles and influences.

“I would be very honored,” Göransson said of a potential nomination. “What’s most gratifying to me is the musicians I worked with in Africa calling me afterward telling me they’ve seen the movie and are so happy to see the Senegalese music represented. That’s been the most gratifying part for me.”

“Creed II” is in theaters now.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Creed II' Film Review: Michael B Jordan and Sylvester Stallone Return for Serviceable Sequel

How Donald Glover's 'Atlanta' Season 2 Stayed 'Weird' While Confronting Success – and Trump

Marvel Boss Kevin Feige on Ryan Coogler's 'Black Panther': 'Best Movie We've Ever Made'

www.thewrap.com | 11/22/18

Thanksgiving is just around the corner in Canada. It's a time of year when the harvest is in, the weather grows colder and families gather to give thanks for all they have.

It is in this moment of gratitude that I want to highlight one of the most valuable and unique offerings in our industry: the ways in which country code top-level domains (ccTLDs) give back. Canadians who choose to use a ccTLD, which for us is .CA, help contribute to investments in the internet community.

CIRA believes that it is important to give back to the internet, whether that be the Canadian internet community or the global internet in which we operate the .CA TLD and participate as a strong contributor. Further, as a not-for-profit organization, CIRA invests its resources into our aspirational goal of building a better online Canada. In fact, we believe so much in this goal that we've invested $6 million dollars over the last five years toward this goal, outside of the investment in our core mandate of bringing .CA to more Canadians and operating a safe, secure and trusted top-level domain.

Many of our ccTLD peers contribute to the internet ecosystem as well. While each organization's program is a little bit different, the intent is the same: to invest in a purpose greater than profit with a return on investment that benefits the communities we serve.

With the exception of a handful of generic TLDs, you won't find this from our more profit-driven peers.

It's a cycle: From community to ccTLD and back

At CIRA, we hold ourselves to high standards in stewarding .CA, which includes providing a safe, secure and stable .CA and underlying domain name system (DNS). We make every effort to provide the best service possible for our customers — .CA holders and others who subscribe to our cybersecurity services.

A portion of the revenue we make, thanks to our customers' trust in us, is funneled back into the Canadian internet community. Here's how:

  • We invest in internet exchange points (IXPs) that provide greater resiliency, data sovereignty and a higher-performing internet in our country. There are 10 IXPs across Canada and we've recently been a catalyst to an additional one in development in the Arctic community of Iqaluit, Nunavut. This will revolutionize the internet there, where right now the community is reliant on satellite connections resulting in slow and expensive internet service.
  • Through our Community Investment Program, we provide grants to organizations across Canada working on the frontlines of the internet. We've contributed $5.45 million over five years through that program. This has included 130 projects from across Canada including one underway now through an organization called Compucorps that will work with Indigenous women to increase their knowledge of website building and online branding to help them engage more in e-commerce. Or the Ragged edge community network stabilization and expansion project that focused on internet infrastructure in Northern Vancouver Island.
  • We're developing and investing in innovative products and services that secure the internet for its users, including our cybersecurity services (our D-Zone suite of products) that keep Canadian schoolchildren safe and add layers of protection to critical healthcare and municipal infrastructure.
  • We encourage Canadians to learn more about their internet by testing its speed and performance through CIRA's Internet Performance Test. There have been over 100,000 tests conducted across the country.
  • We fund, organize and participate in events and forums in Canada and globally where important topics are discussed, which influence internet policy, including an upcoming Canadian Internet Forum, a multistakeholder event being organized for early 2019.

All of that investment improves and expands the internet, gets more Canadians online, safely and securely, and makes it easier and more practical for them to participate in the digital economy. It also creates more opportunities to choose a .CA. Thus, the cycle starts again.

And it's global. We've long shared "giving back" experiences with our European peers — but examples are found around the globe. A recent visit to Brazil showed me a ccTLD highly committed to this cycle of giving back. I was impressed with all they do with their resources and encourage others to learn more from them.

Thanks for making a choice to give back

In Canada, as we gather around the dinner table for our Thanksgiving dinners, I want to give thanks to CIRA's customers for making it possible for our organization to give back. Consumers have more choices than ever when it comes to domain names. They can choose to go with .com or .net, or one of nearly a thousand new domain extensions. But what sets CIRA apart, alongside some of our ccTLD peers, is the determination to give back to the internet ecosystem in our countries. To invest what we earn into a higher purpose.

Thank you to those consumers who chose a ccTLD over others — because of you we're getting closer to a stronger, higher performing and more secure internet every day.

* * *

There are several ccTLDs that give back to the internet community. Here are a few examples.

Sweden: The Internet Foundation in Sweden, IIS invests funds to improve the stability of internet infrastructure in Sweden and to promote internet-focused research, training and education. For example, IIS invested 1 million SEK (about $145,000 CAD) roughly one year ago into Foo Café, a meeting place for developers, which sponsors meetups and events to help developers grow their competence and share knowledge.

Brazil: The Brazilian Internet Steering Committee — a multi-sectoral configuration of 21 members from civil society, the government, the business sector and the academic community — guide the healthy growth of the network in Brazil. One of their initiatives is the Web Technologies Study Center (Ceweb.br), created to help the Brazilian public participate in the global development of the web and public policymaking.

The Netherlands: SIDN not only operates .nl, it also provides funding support to ideas and projects that aim to make the internet stronger or that use the internet in innovative ways. For example, SIDN funded AI for GOOD, a project that aims to use artificial intelligence to improve the world. This online platform presents AI programming challenges to students, start-ups, hackers and developers to solve.

United Kingdom: Nominet funded a granting program for 10 years under the name Nominet Trust. In 2017, that fund began independent operation as the Social Tech Trust and Nominet is now focusing funding on connection, inclusivity and security. For example, they are working with Scouts UK to develop a cybersecurity curriculum and with the Prince's Trust on a digital platform to mentor troubled youth online.

Written by Byron Holland, President and CEO of CIRA

www.circleid.com | 10/4/18

Shin Lim is the winner of America’s Got Talent!

“When you told me at 16 that an awkward, shy kid would one day be performing at the Dolby Theatre performing on America’s Got Talent, I wouldn’t have believed them. To compete on AGT, it means the world to me,” said Lim, who opened up about his carpal tunnel syndrome due to a career-ending injury to his thumb tendons.

The 26-year-old self-taught magician, who was born in Canada and currently lives in Acton, Massachusetts, wowed audiences through sleight of hand magic and close-up tricks. For his final trick, Lim performed a card trick with host Tyra Banks and American Ninja Warrior co-hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila.

During the competition, both judges Howie Mandel and Simon Cowell called Lim “the best close-up magician they have ever seen.”

“You’re the only one that makes me believe that magic is possible,” Heidi Klum said.

Lim becomes the second magician to win AGT. Mat Franco was the winner of the ninth season.

RELATED: America’s Got Talent Finale: Meet Season 13’s Top 10 Finalists

Early in his childhood, Lim, whose parents are from Singapore, showed an interest in music and chose to play the piano at age 9. As a hobby, he practiced magic at age 16.

However, he was diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome at age 20 and was forced to choose between his two interests. Lim gave up his piano career, even dropping out of the School of Music at Lee University in Tennessee.

After learning most of his magic skills from watching YouTube, he appeared twice on Penn Jillette and Teller’s magic competition show, Penn & Teller: Fool Us, in 2015 and 2017. He took his talents overseas, including gigs in Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, Scandinavia, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Taiwan.

Congratulations @shinlimmagic for winning this season of @agt!!!! Now come see him LIVE on Broadway this holiday season in TheIllusionists – Magic of the Holidays #ShinToWin #AGTFinale #TheIllusionists pic.twitter.com/zHLib3JvRq

— THE ILLUSIONISTS ? (@Illusionists7) September 20, 2018

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Lim beat out fellow top 10 finalists: singers Courtney Hadwin, Michael Ketterer, Daniel Emmet, and Glennis Grace as well as comedians Vicki Barbalok and Samuel J. Comroe, and trapeze couple Duo Transcend.

In third place was electric violinist Brian King Joseph and second place was the acrobatic dance group Zurcaroh.

RELATED: AGT‘s Michael Ketterer Wows During Finals After Garth Brooks Invites Him to Sing at His Concert

In addition to the title of season 13 champion, Lim also takes home a $1 million and a headlining gig at the Paris Theater at Paris Las Vegas Nov. 2-4.

Lim, who is the reigning world FISM champion for close-up magic, also has plans to perform alongside The Illusionists, a group of magicians who also got their start on the reality competition.

America’s Got Talent airs Tuesdays and Wednesdays (8 p.m. ET) on NBC.

people.com | 9/20/18

Students from the University of Southern California have been named recipients of four Student Academy Awards for 2018, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Wednesday.

The four USC wins make it the only school to take more than one award. The school was recognized by one nomination in the animation category, one in the documentary category and two in the narrative category.

The other American films schools that won awards were Florida State, CalArts, Ringling College of Art and Design, NYU, the University of California at Berkeley and Chapman University.

Also Read: 'The Driver Is Red,' 'Magic Alps' Take Top Prizes at TheWrap's ShortList Film Festival 2018

In the four international categories, the winners came from schools in the U.K., France, Hungary, Switzerland and Sweden.

While the Academy announced the winners on Wednesday, it will not reveal the medal that each film has won until the Student Academy Awards ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 11 at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. While the three levels of prize — gold, siver and bronze — carry different cash awards, all winners are now qualified for the 2018 Academy Awards in the short-film categories.

Past winners of Student Academy Awards include Spike Lee, Robert Zemeckis, John Lasseter, Cary Fukunaga, Trey Parker and Pete Docter.

Also Read: How Nazis, Drunk College Kids and Stubborn Goats Shaped This Year's ShortList Finalists (Video)

The winners:

Alternative (Domestic Film Schools)
Shae Demandt, “Reanimated,” Florida State University

Animation (Domestic Film Schools)
Yu Yu, “Daisy,” University of Southern California
Hanna Kim, “Raccoon and the Light,” California Institute of the Arts
Eaza Shukla, “Re-Gifted,” Ringling College of Art and Design

Animation (International Film Schools)
Pierre Perveyrie, Maximilien Bougeois, Marine Goalard, Irina Nguyen-Duc and Quentin Dubois, “The Green Bird,” MOPA

Documentary (Domestic Film Schools)
Mathieu Faure, “An Edited Life,” New York University
Lauren Schwartzman, “Dust Rising,” University of California, Berkeley
Yiying Li, “Love & Loss,” University of Southern California

Documentary (International Film Schools)
Mart Bira, “Nomadic Doctor,” University of Hertfordshire

Narrative (Domestic Film Schools)
Brian Robau, “Esta Es Tu Cuba”/”This Is Your Cuba,” Chapman University
Kelley Kali, “Lalo’s House,” University of Southern California
Hua Tong, “Spring Flower,” University of Southern California

Narrative (International Film Schools)
István Kovács, “A Siege,” University of Theatre and Film Arts, Budapest
Lisa Gertsch, “Almost Everything,” Zurich University of the Arts
Jonatan Etzler, “Get Ready with Me,” Stockholm Academy of the Arts

www.thewrap.com | 9/12/18
Researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden have revealed losing sleep disrupts the body's natural clock which in turn encourages cells to prioritise storing fat and reducing muscle mass.

Education in Sweden is mandatory for all children from grade 1 to grade 9 - generally starting in the year of the child’s seventh birthday up until the end of the spring term of the calendar year of the child’s 16th birthday. The school year in Sweden runs from mid/late August to early/mid June. The Christmas holiday from mid December to early January divides the Swedish school year into two terms. Homeschooling is forbidden, unless there are "exceptional circumstances". From the age of one year children can be admitted to pre-school (förskola). Pre-schools both help provide an environment that stimulates children's development and learning, and enable parents to combine parenthood with work or studies. During the year before children start compulsory school, all children are offered a place in a pre-school class (förskoleklass), which combines the pedagogical methods of the pre-school with those of compulsory school. Between ages 6/7 and 15/16, children attend compulsory comprehensive school (grundskola), divided in three stages. The vast majority of schools in Sweden are municipally-run, but there are also autonomous and publicly-funded schools, known as "free schools". The education in free schools has many objectives in common with the municipal school, but it can have an orientation that differs from that of the municipal schools. A handful of boarding schools, known as "private schools", are funded by privately-paid tuition. In 2008, statistics showed that of all Swedes aged 25–64, 15% have completed only compulsory education (as the highest level of attainment), 46% only upper secondary education, 14% only post-secondary education of less than 3 years, and 22% post-secondary education of 3 years or more. Women are more educated than men (26% of women vs 19% of men have post-secondary education of 3 years or more). The level of education is highest among those aged 25–34, and it decreases with age. Both upper secondary school and university studies are financed by taxes. Some Swedes go straight to work after secondary school. Along with several other European countries, the government also subsidizes tuition of international students pursuing a degree at Swedish institutions, although there has been talk of this being changed. Swedish 15-years-old pupils have the 22nd highest average score in the PISA assessments, being neither significantly higher nor lower than the OECD average. Only Canada, the United States, and Japan have higher levels of tertiary degree holders.


From dbpedia, under creative commons CC-BY-SA
w3architect.com | hosting p2pweb.net
afromix.org | afromix.info | mediaport.net | webremix.info