Français | English | Español | Português

Spain Media

ABC’s new primetime summer soap “Grand Hotel” has all the trappings of an ABC primetime soap: murder, intrigue, steamy romance and secret affairs. But it also does something few shows before it have ever done.

Executive produced by Eva Longoria and created by her “Desperate Housewives” and “Devious Maids” collaborator Brian Tanen, “Grand Hotel” takes the classic upstairs/downstairs format and centers it around an affluent, powerful and glamorous Latino family.

“I was obsessed with making sure this wasn’t just going to be developed, that this was going to be on the air,” said Longoria, whose company UnbeliEVAble Entertainment first secured the rights to the Spanish series upon which the show is based. “Iwas a dog with a bone. I was like, ‘This will be on the air.'”

Also Read: Summer TV 2019: Complete List of Premiere Dates for New and Returning Broadcast Shows (Updating)

The drama, debuting Monday, transplants the original tale from 20th Century Spain to present-day Miami Beach, where Demián Bichir and Roselyn Sanchez star as the wealthy owners of the last family-owned hotel on the strip. They’re surrounded by their mildly spoiled adult children, the hotel’s rich guests and support staff who struggling just to keep their jobs.

All that makes for a show predominantly populated by Latino actors. And Longoria, who directs and guest stars in addition to producing, made a point of hiring women and people of color in key roles behind the camera as well.

“All of my producing really is with purpose, like, how do I produce with purpose? Why am I doing this show? why this show, why this cast?” Longoria said. “And for me, this show was about doing an upstairs/downstairs show on television where the upstairs were Latino. And that’s something you don’t really get to see, affluent, intelligent, successful Latinos.

“I really thought, ‘Let’s explore this family, what does this family look like on TV?'” she said.

Also Read: 8 New Summer TV Shows Ranked by Premiere Viewers: From 'Songland' to 'First Responders Live' (Updating)

Read TheWrap’s full interview with Longoria below.

ABC/Eric McCandless

TheWrap: Can you first tell me how you came to the project? I know it’s an adaptation of a Spanish series, but how did you come to this adaptation?

Longoria: I fell in love with the Spanish format, and I was like, “I have to adapt this in English. It’s so good, so juicy.” And I became obsessed with it and then I found Brian Tanen who I worked with on “Desperate Housewives,” and “Devious Maids.” He wrote the adaptation, put it in Miami, made it modern day, and it was just so delicious reading from the first script until the end.

I wanted to ask you about working with Brian because I know you’ve worked with him quite a bit. What is it about your working relationship or his writing?

I love his sensibility. He does family drama and really weaves in so much complexity, whether it’s the mystery storyline, or the romance storyline, or the conflict of business. He’s just so layered in his approach to characters and to plots. And he really has that great tone that “Desperate Housewives” had, and “Devious” where it’s dramatic, but it has a little bit of humor in certain places. And it just really makes for good TV.

The original series is a period piece, so how did you guys settle on the decision to kind of make “Grand Hotel” more contemporary?

Well, we decided to make it contemporary the minute I optioned the format. To really bring those themes into modern times and to see how do those they withstand contemporary times: family, love, work, career, children. Those were some really great themes, so we knew we wanted to make it contemporary and relatable at the same time, so that was a lot of fun, really creating this last family-owned hotel in South Beach and giving this, whenever you say it’s not personal, it’s just business. But what happens when the business is the family business? Everything is personal.

Why Miami? How did you decide on that location?

Brian’s from Miami, that’s his hometown, so he knows it well and chose to set it there. He’s the genius that said, “Let’s do a sexy family drama based in Miami,” and we were like, “Great.” Any chance to shoot in Miami, we were like, “Done.”

How much of the series was shot in Miami? Just the pilot?

The pilot shot in Miami, and then we rebuilt the set. We shot [the pilot] at Fontainebleau, and then we rebuilt Fontainebleau in LA on sound stages.

The sets are fantastic.

Amazing. I mean, they’re jaw dropping.

Did you guys look to the original when you were putting together the adaptation? How much do you borrow and how much of it is its own creation?

I think if you’re a fan of the original, you’re going to recognize some characters, and be pleasantly satisfied with finding those characters. And then, I think if you’re not familiar with the original format, you’re going to really find everybody just to be so juicy and complex. Because there are adaptations and new characters that are not in the original. So I would say both, we really leaned into the original series, and then we also at the same time made it new enough for even fans of the original to want to watch.

ABC/Eric McCandless

The show has this large ensemble cast, but it really is anchored by Demian Bichir and Roselyn Sanchez, these two really accomplished actors kind of at the center of the show. Can you talk a little bit about casting those two roles?

Yeah. The head of the family is this patriarch character that is basically the puppet master of everything that happens in the hotel. And we really couldn’t see anybody else doing this role. I mean, a complex man who has secrets, who is navigating some difficult times right now. Not only with the business, but with his family. And Demian really grounded the whole show in this beautiful character, this big patriarch character. And his character is actually not in the original. He’s actually the combination of a couple of characters. Roselyn, I’ve worked with many times before, but Brian Tanen and I worked with her on “Devious.” So when Brian wrote the character of Gigi, he did it with Roselyn in mind. I don’t think anybody can play this character like Roselyn.

And when it came to filling out the rest of the ensemble, did you guys have kind of a vision in mind? What were you looking for?

When it came to casting, the show is based in Miami, so we wanted to authentically  represent what Miami would look like. That of course means Latino. And we had some young characters, so really looking at some untapped talent. There’s some great new talent coming. For some of them, this is their first thing they’ve ever done. And just tapping into a different well of talent, into the Latino talent pool. That was exciting. Then we have some veterans like Shalim Ortiz who I’ve worked with before and is just a fantastic actor. Shalim has to be Mateo. Jencarlos Canela played El Rey, who is this King of Miami rapper. I’ve worked with him before, we did “Telenovela” together. And then just rounding out the cast with newcomers and veterans, and balancing it all out.

I also wanted to ask you how you kind of view your role as producer. It’s a position that can vary so much from person to person, and project to project, but with this show, how did you approach that role?

I was obsessed with making sure this wasn’t just going to be developed, that this was going to be on the air. I was a dog with a bone. I was like, “This will be on the air.” All of my producing really is with purpose, like, how do I produce with purpose? Why am I doing this show? why this show, why this cast? And for me, this show was about doing an upstairs, downstairs show on television where the upstairs were Latino. And that’s something you don’t really get to see, affluent, intelligent, successful Latinos. I really thought, “Let’s explore this family, what does this family look like on TV?”

You wear quite a few hats: director, actor, producer. And you’ve taken on quite a few projects, including the CW pilot “Glamorous” just recently. What is it that you look for when you’re taking on new projects?

Well, especially if I’m going to be a director-for-hire, it has to be something that speaks to me. When I directed the “Glamorous” pilot for CW, it was a beautiful world that I didn’t see on TV. We called it a queer utopia, and it had every spectrum of people in that show. The creator, Jordon Nardino, just really, on the page, created this world in which queerness was celebrated. I wanted to be definitely a part of building that out with him. And, again, working with a new talent pool. I mean, a lot of the actors in “Glamorous” were untapped potential. Ben J. Pierce, the lead, is a star just waiting to burst onto the scene. We had Chester Lockhart, who is known in the queer community, and just a great, great actor, great talent. Their stories of their journey in Hollywood, of not getting opportunities that they deserve was heartbreaking. So to have a show that says, “This is me, this reflects me, this reflects my life, this reflects people I know,” that’s what drew me to that project.

And it’s not over. We’re still re-shooting some stuff to see if we can get it to series. Oh my gosh, it’s such an important show. The CW really likes the world, and I think we’re going to make it happen.

That’s great to hear. Last thing, I know you’re going to appear on “Grand Hotel” later this season playing Beatriz, the matriarch character whose absence kind of looms over the early couple of episodes. Can you tease a little bit about the character?

Well, I will tell you, I’m dead.

But really, really dead? It is a telenovela, after all.

I’m dead in the show, yes. You only see me in flashbacks. I’m not in many episodes, but I’m a very important part of the season long mystery. And a lot of questions will be answered. There’s actually a flashback episode later in the season. The whole episode is almost one big flashback, and it really gets to let the audience in as to what did happen with Gigi and Beatriz, and Beatriz and Santiago, and what happened with her kids. And you get to see it all happen.

ABC/Eric McCandless

“Grand Hotel” airs Mondays at 10/9c on ABC.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Summer TV 2019: Complete List of Premiere Dates for New and Returning Broadcast Shows (Updating)

8 New Summer TV Shows Ranked by Premiere Viewers: From 'Songland' to 'First Responders Live' (Updating)

Eva Longoria's Soapy Drama Pilot 'Grand Hotel' Checks in at ABC

www.thewrap.com | 6/18/19

(Warning: This post contains spoilers for the “Black Mirror” Season 5 episode “Smithereens.”)

On the surface, “Smithereens,” the Season 5 episode of “Black Mirror,” can feel a bit like a departure from the rest of the glossy sci-fi anthology series — for one thing, it takes place in the past — but upon closer inspection, it bears many of the show’s most recognizable hallmarks.

Set in the year 2018, the episode features no futuristic technology or lavish special effects, just a good old-fashioned phone call between two men, played by Andrew Scott and Topher Grace, who both have come to feel a growing sense of isolation in a world ruled by big tech companies, though in two very different ways. And if there’s a common theme running through every episode of “Black Mirror,” it’s the idea that technology, for all its ability to bring people together, can rip us apart and isolate us just as quickly.

“I’m especially drawn to the episodes that are slightly less about the technology and more about emotion, and I thought this episode was that,” Grace told TheWrap. “The thing I loved right away when I first started reading it was the fact that it’s a period piece. It takes place in 2018, and for ‘Black Mirror,’ that’s like the distant past. I thought that was really interesting. And then the character was just delicious.”

Netflix

Also Read: Here Are All the Ways 'Black Mirror' Season 5 Connects to the Rest of the Show's Universe

Grace’s Billy Bauer is a somewhat pitifully tragic character whose absence — thanks to a 10-day “silence retreat” to contemplate the fact that his company has grown beyond his control — consumes much of the first half of the episode. But much of the episode’s forward momentum comes from Scott’s heartbreaking turn as a man whose grief has become so all-consuming he’s willing to go as far as taking a hostage to force someone to finally acknowledge it.

Scott was already attached to the episode when Grace was offered the part, and as a self-proclaimed fan of both the actor and of “Black Mirror,” Grace jumped at the opportunity. “I’m a huge fan of ‘Sherlock’ and the work Andrew’s done on that,” Grace said. “I mean, there’s no finer actor.”

But in an appropriately “Black Mirror” twist, the two actors never physically shared the same set. Grace’s scenes were shot on a cliffside in Spain, while the bulk of Scott’s performance was delivered in a London field. Their dialogue, over the phone, was spliced together in post-production.

“It’s unbelievable, the work he’s done on this episode,” Grace said of his co-star. “My only regret is that we didn’t get to do it together.”

Also Read: 'Striking Vipers' to 'San Junipero': Every 'Black Mirror' Episode Ranked, From Good to Mind-Blowing (Photos)

We talked with Grace about his favorite “Black Mirror” episodes, the inspiration for Billy Bauer, and why he almost shaved his head for the role.

Netflix

TheWrap: Were you a fan of “Black Mirror” before you signed on to do this episode?

Grace: Oh yeah. Big time.

What was it that made you want to do this episode, and play this character in particular?

I love all “Black Mirrors.” It’s one of my favorite programs, hands down. But I’m especially drawn to the episodes that are slightly less about the technology and more about emotion, and I thought this episode was that. The thing I loved right away when I first started reading it was the fact that it’s a period piece. It takes place in 2018, and for “Black Mirror,” that’s like the distant past. I thought that was really interesting. And then the character was just delicious.

How was Billy described on the page? What in particular jumped out at you?

It’s funny, I had this little bit in “BlacKkKlansman” too, where I was this big part of the movie, but for the first part of the movie everyone’s just talking about the character. That same thing happened here. It’s a little bit nerve-racking as an actor to be turning the pages and hearing so much about your character but you still haven’t met him yet, so there’s kind of a build up. What surprised me was when I started reading the character’s point of view and seeing where he came down on the situation. It just goes to show what a lovely writer [co-creator] Charlie [Brooker] is that he went in a totally different way than I thought [he would] — and, I think, the way the audience watching the episode will think it’s going to go.

Netflix

Twitter chief Jack Dorsey kind of seems like the obvious connection to make here, but did you look to this group of young tech moguls who are all of a sudden finding themselves in over their heads when you were forming this character?

Yeah, I didn’t use the word “young,” though. They were all young at some point, sure, but they brand themselves that way, these guys, even if they don’t know it. You know what Steve Jobs’ look is. You know what Richard Branson’s look is. They really set themselves apart, and I’m not even sure it’s something they know they’re doing. It probably is, but I don’t know. When I first started, I called Charlie and [co-creator] Annabel [Jones] and said, “I wanted to shave my head bald.” Because they always have a look. They always have something before they’re successful that makes you gravitate to them, and I think that’s something they’re trying to do. In the end, they talked me out of that, plus I was about to do press for “BlacKkKlansman,” which is probably not the best time to have a shaved head. So we landed on the look that he has on the show. It comes from him clearly being in an interesting place in his life where he’s built this thing, this whole image, and it’s become kind of a runaway train.

The first half or so of the episode is Andrew’s character trying to get through to Billy, but there are all these layers of people trying to protect him, or protect the company, at least –

Yeah, I don’t think anybody’s trying to protect Billy. [Laughs.] It’s funny. I was excited to play the character when I thought I knew where it was going. But when it went in a totally different direction, I was like, Man, I have to do this. This is amazing. Only Charlie would write you into a specific place and then take it somewhere else entirely.

But what’s Billy’s motivation there? Why does he decide, after everything else that happened before, actually yeah, I’m going to talk to this guy?

I think a lot of these guys really understand publicity. They show a couple shots of magazine covers and press photos in the episode, so [Billy] clearly knows how to navigate that world and knows how to really stand out. It’s a new thing. Where you haven’t even heard of this guy’s platform and then all of a sudden your whole life is run by that technology and that guy has a hand in every part of your life. Or that company does, at least. And one thing these guys also share besides having that specific look, is they all have this quest for spirituality. I’m not sure if they believed in it in the beginning or if they believe in it now, but I think that they think they do. So Billy’s definitely at an interesting moment in his life. You meet him on this silence retreat, and whether or not it’s real, he believes it is, this moment of crisis that he’s going through.

Netflix

So much of the episode is driven by Andrew’s performance –

He already had the role by the way, when I received the script. And I’m a huge fan of “Sherlock” and the work Andrew’s done on that. I mean, there’s no finer actor. It’s unbelievable, the work he’s done on this episode. My only regret is that we didn’t get to do it together.

How much were you aware of what he was doing while you were shooting your scenes?

In “BlacKkKlansman,” I also had a lot of stuff on the phone, with John David Washington, but we were set up back to back for those scenes. And we were both on camera at the same time, so we could interrupt each other and connect. I’d never had that experience before. For this, my part was in Spain. They showed me a photo of this house on a cliff, and I thought, ‘Wow, this location is great, it says so much about the character.’ My only misgiving was that I didn’t get to do it with Andrew. But they could not have been more wonderful; I had the most amazing experience on this show. They flew me to London, and I got to see the field and see where the rest of it was taking place, and then James Hawes, who directed it, hired an actor to come with us to Spain and read Andrew’s part. He had watched the other performance and was sort of keyed up to the level Andrew would be at. I really felt so grateful to Charlie and Annabel and James. They didn’t have to do that, but it really helped me match the level he was at.

After that phone call, whatever happens at the end of the episode, what does Billy take away from that conversation? How does he proceed from here?

Oh, well, it’s Charlie’s episode. I wouldn’t want to impose on that. What’s so great about what they do is they let it be more ambiguous than American television is sometimes. So I wouldn’t want to wade into how Charlie would want you to experience it.

Fair enough. “Black Mirror” is the kind of show that seems to invite people to pick and choose their favorite episodes. As a fan, do you have a favorite?

You know a show is working when it’s like trading cards, and people can’t stop talking about their favorite ones. My favorite is “Be Right Back,” which I think is true for a lot of people, the one with Hayley Atwell and Domhnall Gleeson. But that one was my first one, and I have a theory that with anthologies like these and like “Twilight Zone,” you’re always chasing that high of the first one you experienced. But I loved “USS Callister.” “Nosedive,” too.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Black Mirror': Yahya Abdul-Mateen II Has Just as Many Questions as You Do About That 'Striking Vipers' Twist

Here Are All the Ways 'Black Mirror' Season 5 Connects to the Rest of the Show's Universe

'Striking Vipers' to 'San Junipero': Every 'Black Mirror' Episode Ranked, From Good to Mind-Blowing (Photos)

www.thewrap.com | 6/8/19
Tony Hale and Sophie Turner on the End of ‘Veep’ and ‘Game of Thrones’ TheWrap Emmy magazine: Stars discuss the “liberating and sad” feeling as their HBO juggernauts wrap up By Steve Pond | May 24, 2019 @ 10:34 AM This cover story on Tony Hale and Sophie Turner first appeared in the Race Begins issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

On the surface, there wasn’t a lot of similarity between “Game of Thrones” and “Veep.” One was set in a mythical land of dragons, sorceresses and brutal warriors, one in a version of today’s Washington, D.C., that seems less absurd with every new headline out of the Oval Office. One’s a drama, one a comedy.

But the shows had a few things in common, too. Both aired on HBO as part of the network’s signature Sunday-night lineup for most of the last decade, and both have won the top Emmy in their category in three of the last four years: “Game of Thrones” in 2015, 2016 and 2018, “Veep” in 2015, 2016 and 2017. (The years they didn’t win in that stretch, they weren’t eligible.)

So we figured it’d be fun to ask Tony Hale, who plays the meek and oft-humiliated “body man” to Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ Selina Meyer in “Veep,” to do some playacting as King of the North Jon Snow from “Game of Thrones”; and to ask Sophie Turner, the once-meek, now formidable Sansa Stark from “Thrones,” to slip into Selina’s power dress. And then we got them to talk about what it’s like to come to the end of an iconic television series.

Also Read: See 'Game of Thrones' Star Sophie Turner and 'Veep' Actor Tony Hale Swap Shows (Photos)

Has it sunk in that you won’t be playing these roles anymore?
SOPHIE TURNER It hasn’t. I think it’s going to take me a while. It’s probably going to hit me this summer, when we’re not back in Belfast. But right now I still feel like I haven’t said goodbye properly yet. And I don’t know how to, really. I think it’s gonna take me years.

TONY HALE I think I’m the same way. It’s going to hit me the most in the fall, when we’re not shooting. For now, it comes in waves. The last week of shooting was an emotional tsunami. And when we see each other for press, you get that wave again. We just like each other so much — that’s the problem. I think I’ll probably just go over to each person’s house and spend the night. That’ll make it better.

Let’s compare notes. How emotional was shooting your last scenes?
HALE It was very, very emotional. Are you gonna trigger a lot of emotions now? You’re gonna trigger all my emotions.

It was like a four-day marathon of tears. We did a big table read of the last episode, and then I saw Tim [Simons] and Clea [DuVall] crying, and that got me crying. And then Julia gave a speech and we all cried again. And then the last day of shooting, every time somebody would wrap out we’d gather around the monitors. Matt Walsh sang a funny song, like “Celebrate,” but we still cried at that.

And then I was telling Julia, “OK, we’ve gotta keep it together,” but as I’m saying, “Keep it together,” I’m crying.

Also Read: Reid Scott Describes the Final Day on 'Veep' Set: 'Very Much a Party Atmosphere' (Video)

Was your last scene with Julia?
HALE Yeah. I think she was talking to Dave Mandel, the showrunner, and then behind the camera she saw that I was starting to cry, but I had to keep it together. It was just a mess.

Sophie, what was your final scene like?
TURNER Oh, God. It was terrible. For starters, it was a scene that we had been shooting for five days straight in the sun in Spain. So I kept going between the feeling of, “God, I can’t wait for this scene to be over,” and, “Please don’t ever let this end.”

It was like this weird Groundhog Day — you never really wanted it to end, but it was driving you nuts. But toward the end, I could feel it kind of winding down. We would cut, and they would talk amongst themselves, and I would start tearing up, and then they’d be like, “OK, moving on, next setup,” and you’d have to wipe the tears away and be fine again.

When it came to the very final shot, Dave and Dan [showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss] do this thing where they present each of us with the storyboard of their favorite scene of your character, and then say some lovely words about you in front of the cast and crew. I just broke down crying, and I was inconsolable for three or four hours. It was probably one of the saddest days of my life. And I don’t think I’m done with my crying yet.

“Game of Thrones” and “Veep” are obviously dramatically different shows, but they’re both on HBO on Sunday nights, and on some level they’re both about the quest for power…
HALE Oh, yeah. Selina is Cersei. We’ve got our own game of thrones happening. We’re all circling her throne.

Do you feel a kinship between the shows?
TURNER Absolutely. Whenever I meet people from HBO shows, I feel like we’re all a family. Especially with “Veep,” which has been on just about the same amount of time that we’ve been on. It’s the same thing as the “Game of Thrones” cast — you look at the “Veep” cast and you think, at the beginning of this you never knew how long or how amazing or how wonderful this show was going to be, and now look, we’ve completed almost 10 years.

HALE I’m a fan of “Game of Thrones,” and I love how opposite the shows are, but how if you really look at the baseline, it’s all about everybody reaching for power. Everybody’s stabbing each other in the back to get ahead, and you also see how meaningless it is. It’s all selfishness and ego.

In our world, there’s a tremendous amount of comedy that can come out of that. In their world, it’s typically a tremendous amount of violence and drama. But it has a similar foundation.

Clearly, there’s a huge difference between your characters: Gary Walsh is maybe even more of a lapdog than he was at the beginning of the series, while Sansa Stark has matured from a timid little girl with fairy tales in her head to a powerful force.
HALE She has ascended and I have descended.

Did either of you have any sense when you started of what was ahead for your character?
TURNER Oh, my God, I had no idea. No idea. I wasn’t allowed to read the books, you see, when I first started to do the show, because I was only 13 and they were too graphic for me. We only know when we get the scripts for the next season — that’s when we find out what happens to us. So it’s been this wild journey of reading the script for the next season and going “Oh, my God, look at these characters, I can’t believe this is happening.”

We the cast have been watching it along with all the viewers, and having the exact same reactions, just six months ahead of them.

HALE That’s probably what I’m going to miss the most — sitting down for the table read and having the surprise of finding out what’s happening. You would hear hints at the beginning of the season about where your character is going, but you never really know because it morphs so much. Every single table read, I was like, “I cannot believe that he is that dysfunctional. I cannot believe that he is continuing in this abuse.”

You do watch the final season and think, “Will this guy ever not willingly let himself be humiliated?”
HALE No. When Selina Meyer is out of his life, he’s just going to go on Match.com and find another mother figure to attach himself to. That’s his normal.

Also Read: Colbert's 'Veep'-'The Late Show' Crossover Explores the Most Depressing Multiverse Ever (Video)

Sophie, beginning a show like this at that age must have an enormous impact on every area of your life.
TURNER It’s changed everything about me. Especially because “Game of Thrones” came at a time in my life when everything was changing. I was in my adolescence, and everyone’s kind of going through massive changes. This show informed who I am as a person — not only how to be on set and how to act in front of the camera, but also how to be a businesswoman.

We were treated like adults at a very young age, we had to deal with very sensitive material, and so I learned life lessons on “Game of Thrones.” I learned everything from that show.

Near the end of the season, there was some controversy over Sansa telling the Hound that her rape and imprisonment had made her mature — people took exception to the idea that her assault and mistreatment was somehow responsible for her becoming a strong woman.
TURNER I think that absolutely it was not so much the assault — what made her the person she is today, the politician and the manipulator, was the mentality, not the things that she went through. She made a conscious decision to stay quiet, to keep learning, to keep absorbing information from all of these people who are manipulating her or keeping her captive.

It’s a wonderful thing to see a sexual assault survivor grow from that, and see her turn into this political leader she is today — but no, the rape is absolutely not a plot device to make the character seem stronger. The sexual assault made her resilient, but by no means has it made her this wonderful character that we see today. It absolutely broke her, and we saw that on screen. But seeing her thriving is so wonderful to see.

Is there any sense in which either of you are now relieved that it’s over and you can move on?
HALE It’s very bittersweet. I’m sure Sophie feels the same way, because you care about the family you’ve created, and it’s always hard to walk away from those connections. But it’s exciting to see what kind of other projects might come. My hope is that both the quality and the relationships are the same. The quality of the work is the same as “Veep,” and the depth of the relationships is the same. Because that relationship part is really what brings the joy and the community.

TURNER Yeah, it’s a liberating feeling, as well as a sad feeling. We have all this time ahead, and it’s a new chapter that we’re moving on to. And that’s something I’m really excited to explore. I’ve only really done drama, so I’m excited to have the time to explore many different genres of filmmaking and behind-the-camera things.

Has it changed what you want to do with your careers from here?
TURNER It has changed. For me and a few others, “Game of Thrones” was our first job ever, so the standards are incredibly high now. We have to find projects with incredible female characters and incredible writing, because with “Game of Thrones” we’ve been absolutely spoiled.

It’s difficult to find characters as well-written as Sansa Stark. But it’s kind of inspired me to start screenwriting, because if you can’t find those roles for yourself, you’ve got to make them for yourself.

HALE It’s also like, the older I get, the more doing it for the wrong reasons kind of fades away. All the ego and all the entitlements that can surround a set, it’s just bulls— that completely sucks the energy out of a room. You just want the kindness and the care for the work and trying to be a team player — that’s the stuff that really matters.

Read more from the Race Begins edition of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

Related stories from TheWrap:

See 'Game of Thrones' Star Sophie Turner and 'Veep' Actor Tony Hale Swap Shows (Photos)

Reid Scott Describes the Final Day on 'Veep' Set: 'Very Much a Party Atmosphere' (Video)

www.thewrap.com | 5/28/19

This weekend, a European phenomenon is back — though Americans may have to hunt for clips on YouTube or seek out a VPN and watch via another country’s home broadcaster.

The Eurovision Song Contest, a cross between “The X Factor” and the Miss Universe pageant that offers Yanks a glimpse of what it’s like to be in a culture that doesn’t have jazz and blues as the foundation of its pop music.

For those who’ve never seen — or even heard of Eurovision — before, here’s a quick primer to get you caught up.

Also Read: Taylor Swift on 'Taylor Swift Award' Win: 'I'm Really Super Relieved' (Video)

What exactly is this contest?
Eurovision began as an idea back in the mid-1950s as a way for Europe to come together after World War II had ripped it apart. It was a pretty revolutionary effort for its time. Television was still the Wild West of communications and the Olympics hadn’t yet become an international broadcasting event. Eurovision was one of the first major attempts to hold an event that people from a wide range of countries could watch. With that in mind, the organizers wanted each country to showcase a song that was indicative of their culture.

That sounds like a pretty noble goal.
Yes … but it was also very out of touch with what was happening with music at the time. Rock ‘n’ roll was beginning to take root and The Beatles would take the world by storm just a few years after Eurovision’s inception. This meant that Eurovision’s lineup of ballads and cultural pieces quickly felt antiquated compared to the rock revolution that was going on in the charts. And that was six decades ago … the entries would only get weirder from there.

How weird?
For starters, there was once a rule implemented on and off over the years stating that participants could only enter songs that were in their country’s main language. When that rule was in effect, some countries found a loophole: give the song a hook that involves complete gibberish. Songs with titles like “Boom Boom” and “Diggi-loo Diggi-ley” poured out while the home-language rule was in effect.

Then there are the artists themselves. As Eurovision has evolved, more and more ridiculous acts have come out of the woodwork. Finnish monster-rock bands, Russian grandmas and Latvian pirates are among the acts that have performed for a TV audience of hundreds of millions in recent Eurovisions. And that Finnish monster rock band actually won.

Also Read: Celine Dion's Brother Daniel Dies Just 2 Days After Her Husband

Jeez! So is this just some musical freak show?
Well … let’s be fair. While there’s always been some silly novelty acts, there’s also some solid bits of Europop on hand every year from genuinely talented folks. Sweden won in 2012 with “Euphoria,” a soaring dance track by “Idol” contestant Loreen that went multi-platinum in her country after her victory.

There’s also a small handful of top stars on the winners’ list you might recognize. ABBA used Eurovision as a launch pad to stardom in 1974 with their song “Waterloo,” and French-Canadian Celine Dion’s win in 1988 was her biggest claim to fame before “Titanic” came out. Quality — or at least creativity — does tend to win out at Eurovision.

OK, so how does this contest work?
First, all the countries have a national contest where they vote on which song will represent at Eurovision. The participants are divided up into two semifinals, with the exception of the host nation and the “Big Five” countries — France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the U.K. — who automatically qualify for the final.  They are joined by the 10 countries that get the most votes in each semifinal. In the final, all 26 countries get three minutes to make a good impression, and then the whole continent votes “Idol”-style (not for their home country, of course), as do professional juries for each country.

Then the show transitions to a long procession of national “ambassadors” reading out who each country gave their votes to. The top 10 performers in each country’s vote get points, with 12 points going to the top vote-getter, followed by 10 and then eight down to one for the rest of the order. The same goes with the juries, but with 10 points going to the performer in first place.

And what does the performer with the most points win?
This trophy. Oh, and their country gets to host the competition next year.

What? No prize money? No contract? No vague promises of superstardom?
Nope. The winners do get their 15 minutes of fame and some success on the charts, but beyond ABBA and Celine, Eurovision winners almost never have long-term success. Again, Eurovision long ago moved away from the sort of music that leaves a lasting cultural impact.

Even now, a good chunk of the acts are homogenous power ballads that can blur together when performed in succession. Still, Eurovision is worth watching just for the spectacle of it all. The Disneyland-esque sweetness of the proceedings is charming, and the lack of stakes for the performers keeps it feeling light and fun rather than a battle for wealth, glory, and continental supremacy.

Also Read: 'Can't Stop the Feeling': Justin Timberlake Drops Catchy New Single (Video)

It has also made headlines in recent years that have allowed it to take steps beyond the realm of annual oddities like the Running of the Bulls. The winner in 2014 was gay Austrian singer Thomas Neuwirth, who performed as drag queen superstar Conchita Wurst. The victory transformed Conchita into an LGBT icon in Europe, even as Russian conservatives raged in fury and used the singer as an example of why Russia shouldn’t be a part of the EU. For all of Eurovision’s platitudes about tolerance and peace, this was a moment where those ideals were actually acted upon, even if it meant breaking the general tone of inoffensiveness.

If it’s supposed to be European, why is Australia a competitor?
It turns out that Eurovision has a major cult following in Australia, and they were invited to compete several years ago as a thanks for all the support down under. The expansion of the European Union means countries like Azerbaijan and Israel get to compete too.

So…if all these countries that aren’t strictly European are competing, does this mean we may be seeing the USA compete in Eurovision soon?
Eh…don’t count on it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Taylor Swift Dances 'Like No One's Watching' to The Darkness in New Apple Music Ad (Video)

Led Zeppelin Copyright Case Heats Up as Lawyers Clash Over Music Experts

Music Mogul Irving Azoff to YouTube: Stop Pretending You Love Musicians

Eurovision's 9 Most Famous and Bizarre Moments, From ABBA to Russian Grandmas (Videos)

www.thewrap.com | 5/18/19

Woody Allen’s film “A Rainy Day in New York” has been picked up for distribution in multiple European, South American and Asian territories, according to the New York Times.

On Monday, TheWrap reported that Italian distributor Lucky Red acquired the film for release in Italy on Oct. 3. The Times notes that A Contracorriente Films will now also release “A Rainy Day in New York” the following day on Oct. 4 in Spain.

A spokesperson told the Times that Filmwelt/NFP will release the film in Germany and Austria, and Filmwelt/NFP’s managing director Christopher Ott said in an interview with a German newspaper that they would be among the distributors bringing the film to Europe, China, Japan, South Korea, Russia and South America.

Also Read: Amazon Fires Back at Woody Allen Over Breach of Contract Lawsuit

Italian news reports said on Monday said that “A Rainy Day in New York” was also likely to be shown in France, the Netherlands and Belgium.

Allen’s film was blocked for release in the U.S. after distributor Amazon Studios terminated its four-picture deal with the director after the resurfacing of old accusations that Allen inappropriately touched Dylan Farrow, his then-7-year-old daughter with ex-girlfriend Mia Farrow. (Investigators found no evidence of abuse and Allen has repeatedly denied the accusations.)

In February, Allen responded and filed a $68 million lawsuit against Amazon Studios, claiming breach of contract. In April, Amazon pushed back and said it was “justified” in terminating the contract.

Also Read: Hollywood's Highest Paid Executives: Who Made Bank, Who Sank in 2018 (Updating)

Allen had also announced plans to shoot another film with the backing of Barcelona-based financing conglomerate Mediapro, which previously helped fund “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” and “Midnight in Paris.”

“A Rainy Day in New York” stars Elle Fanning and Timothée Chalamet as two young people who arrive in New York and encounter rain and a series of unfortunate adventures. It also stars Rebecca Hall, Selena Gomez, Jude Law, Suki Waterhouse, Liev Schreiber and Diego Luna. Many of the stars of the film, including Chalamet and Hall, agreed to donate their salaries from the film to Time’s Up and LGBT charities.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Woody Allen Memoir Proposal Rejected by 4 Publishers (Report)

Javier Bardem Blasts 'Public Lynching' of 'Genius' Woody Allen

Mia Farrow on Her Time With Woody Allen: 'It's Not All Black or White'

www.thewrap.com | 5/9/19

PORT OF Spain – At least 23 people, including two children, are feared drowned after their boat overturned early Wednesday morning off the coast of Venezuela, the Trinidad Express newspaper reported Thursday....

www.nationnews.com | 4/25/19

Eleven months after signing a pledge to help increase the number of films by female directors at international festivals, the Cannes Film Festival has unveiled a lineup that features four films directed by women in the main competition, tying but not breaking the record set in 2011.

The four are Mati Diop with “Atlantique,” Jessica Hausner with “Little Joe,” Celine Schiamma with “Portrait of a Young Lady on Fire” and Justine Triet with “Sibyl.” An additional nine female directors are included in other sections of the festival.

Prior to this year, only 82 women were in the official competition at Cannes, as compared to more than 1,600 men.

Also Read: Cannes Film Festival Signs Pledge for More Women Directors, More Transparency

The lineup is filled with heavyweight directors whose films have been at Cannes in the past: Pedro Almodovar (“Pain and Glory,” which has already opened in Spain), the Dardenne brothers (“Young Ahmed”), Bong Joon-ho (“Parasite”), Ken Loach (“Sorry We Missed You”), Xavier Dolan (“Matthias & Maxime”) and, in one of the biggest gets for the festival, Terrence Malick, who has finished his long-awaited World War II-era film “A Hidden Life” and will return to the festival where he won the Palme d’Or with “The Tree of Life” in 2011.

The lineup gives the annual event one of its most substantial collections of celebrated international auteurs in years — though is it conspicuously missing Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” which festival director Thierry Fremaux said is not yet ready to be screened. James Gray’s “Ad Astra,” another film widely touted as a likely Cannes entry, is also not ready, according to Fremaux.

Other films in the main competition include Marco Bellocchio’s “Le Traitre,” Arnaud Desplechin’s “Oh, Mercy,” Kleber Mendonca Filho and Juliano Dornelles’ “Bacurau,” Corneliu Porumboiu’s “The Whistler” and Ira Sachs’ “Frankie.”

Also Read: Tarantino's 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' Teaser Drops Timely Clues It Goes Back Way Before the Manson Murders

Films screening out of competition will include the Elton John biopic “Rocketman,” Claude Lelouch’s “The Best Years of a Life,” Asif Kapadia’s documentary “Diego Maradona” and two episodes of Nicolas Winding Refn’s upcoming television series “Too Old to Die Young – North of Hollywood, West of Hell.”

Additional films will be added to the official selection before the festival begins on May 14.

The official Cannes lineup:

MAIN COMPETITION
“The Dead Don’t Die,” Jim Jarmusch (opening night)
“Pain and Glory,” Pedro Almodovar
“Le Traitre,” Marco Bellocchio
“The Wild Goose Lake,” Diao Yinan
“Parasite,” Bong Joon-ho
“Young Ahmed,” Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne
“Oh, Mercy,” Arnaud Desplechin
“Atlantique,” Mati Diop
“Matthias & Maxime,” Xavier Dolan
“Little Joe,” Jessica Hausner
“Sorry We Missed You,” Ken Loach
“Les Miserables,” Ladj Ly
“A Hidden Life,” Terrence Malick
“Bacurau,” Kleber Mendonca Filho & Juliano Dornelles
“The Whistlers,” Corneliu Porumboiu
“Frankie,” Ira Sachs
“Portrait of a Young Lady on Fire,” Celine Sciamma
“It Must Be Heaven,” Elia Suleima
“Sibyl,” Justine Triet

Also Read: Adam Driver, Bill Murray, Tilda Swinton Team Up in Zombie Comedy 'The Dead Don't Die' (Video)

OUT OF COMPETITION
“The Best Years of a Life,” Claude Lelouch
“Rocketman,” Dexter Fletcher
“Too Old to Die Young – North of Hollywood, West of Hell,” Nicolas Winding Refn
“Diego Maradona,” Asif Kapadia
“La Belle Epoque,” Nicolas Bedos

MIDNIGHT MOVIES
“The Gangster, The Cop, the Devil” Lee Won-Tae

SPECIAL SELECTIONS
“Share,” Pippa Bianco
“For Sama,” Waad Al Kateab & Edward Watts
“Family Romance, LLC,” Werner Herzog
“Tomasso,” Abel Ferrara
“Entre Vivant et le Savior,” Alain Cavalier
“Que Sea Ley,” Juan Solanas

UN CERTAIN REGARD
“Vida Invisible,” Karim Ainouz
“Dylda” (“Beanpole”), Kantemir Balagov
“The Swallows of Kabul,” Zabou Brightman & Elea Gobe Mevellec
“A Brother’s Love,” Monia Chokri
“The Climb,” Michael Covino
“Jeanne (Joan of Arc),” Bruno Dumont
“O Que Arde” (“A Sun That Never Sets”), Olivier Laxe
“Chambre 212,” Christophe Honore
“Port Authority,” Danielle Lessovitz
“Papicha,” Mounia Meddour
“Adam,” Maryam Touzani
“Zhou Ren Mi Mi,” Midi Z
“Liberte” (“Freedom”), Albert Serra
“Bull,” Annie Silverstein
“Summer of Changsha,” Zou Feng
“Evge,” Nariman Aliev

Related stories from TheWrap:

French Actor Alain Delon to Receive Honorary Palme d'Or at Cannes Film Festival

Jim Jarmusch's 'The Dead Don't Die' Set as Cannes Opening Night Film

Cannes Debuts Childcare and Breastfeeding Stations for Working Parents

www.thewrap.com | 4/18/19
Spain's Socialist leader and incumbent prime minister Pedro Sanchez has agreed to a single television debate with the lead candidates from three other main parties, following controversy over a potential debate appearance by a surging far-right party.
www.foxnews.com | 4/17/19
An ATM robbery in Ahoghill and a teenager's fall from a balcony in Spain make the NI newspaper front pages.
www.bbc.co.uk | 4/2/19
After a year-long investigation into her alleged failure to pay 14.5 million euros (over $16.5 million) to the Spanish government, Shakira will reportedly face criminal tax fraud charges, according to Spain’s El Pais newspaper. A report in El Pais published on Friday (12/7) said that authorities have notified the singer’s attorney of the pending court…
www.stereogum.com | 12/8/18
The U.K. production “Man in an Orange Shirt” won the International Emmy Award for best movie/miniseries at the 46th annual ceremony in New York. The top drama series award went to Spain’s “Money Heist.” “Heist” was produced by Vancouver Media and Atresmedia Televisión. “Man in an Orange Shirt,” produced by the U.K.’s Kudos banner, starred […]
variety.com | 11/20/18

Two-time Oscar nominee Bruce Dern is set to play George Spahn, the ranch owner who rented his land to Charles Manson and his cult of followers in Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Burt Reynolds was previously cast in the role before he died on Sept. 6. Reynolds had not shot his scenes before his death. With the help of producer Atit Shah and director Martin Rosete currently shooting “Remember Me” in Spain, Dern will leave that production early to take on the role.

Tarantino has said that “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” wouldn’t be based on Tate’s murder, but would use it as the backdrop for the story of a past-his-prime actor (DiCaprio) and his stuntman (Pitt) looking for one last big break in a Hollywood that left them behind.

Also Read: 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' Adds Rumer Willis, Margaret Qualley and Damon Herriman (Exclusive)

Dern and Reynolds worked together multiple times over the course of their respective careers, including 2003’s TV movie “Hard Ground” which Reynolds actually directed Dern for two days on this film. Other television credits in which duo worked together also include 1999’s “Hard Time: The Premonition,” 1965’s “12 O’Clock High,” and the second season third episode of “The Jones Boys.”

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” will be distributed by Sony and is set to hit theaters July 26, 2019.

Producers are David Heyman, Quentin Tarantino, and Shannon McIntosh. Tarantino wrote and is directing the film.

Deadline first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tarantino's 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood': How the Stars Compare to Real-Life Characters (Photos)

Quentin Tarantino Finds His Bruce Lee for 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood': How Mike Moh Honored Lee

Margot Robbie Is Sharon Tate in First Look at Quentin Tarantino's 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' (Photo)

www.thewrap.com | 9/27/18

For me, it’s real easy to say I love reality television. I know some people really don’t like it or they look down on those who do, but when you have someone as hot as Natalie Nunn on your TV screen, I really don’t know you don’t tune in every week. I know it’s fake […]

The post Celebrity Big Brother Star Natalie Nunn Stunning Bikini Body In Spain appeared first on Egotastic - Sexy Celebrity Gossip and Entertainment News.

egotastic.com | 9/12/18

With his Vidal-Buckley documentary “Best of Enemies” and this year’s smash hit about Fred Rogers, “Won’t You Be My Neighbor,” filmmaker Morgan Neville has proven himself a keenly sensitive, artful showman when surveying a career through archival footage and fresh interviews. He knows how to re-light the flame of a life, and that’s quickly apparent in his deeply entertaining and illuminating Orson Welles documentary “They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead.”

With impish respect, it chronicles the tortuous journey of Welles’ most notoriously unfinished-in-his-lifetime last movie, “The Other Side of the Wind.”

For cinephiles, it’s a high-calorie, clip-and-interview-laden feast of biography, insight, and gossip. Add to that the bonus that — unlike the dashed promise felt after absorbing “Jorodorwsky’s Dune” that the cinema gods were robbed — in this case there’s a finally completed “Wind,” assembled in recent years, also going out through Netflix. to go with Neville’s exhaustive behind-the-scenes appreciation. (Having watched “They’ll Love Me” prior to “Wind,” it’s safe to say they can be enjoyed in either order, since repeat viewings are likely for movie lovers, anyway.)

Watch Video: Watch the Trailer for Orson Welles' Lost Film 'The Other Side of the Wind'

Using an elegantly shot (in black-and-white) Alan Cumming at a reel-stacked edit bay as a Wellesian narrating device, Neville wastes no time setting the scene: how by the late 1960s, strapped for funding, still living in the shadow of “Citizen Kane,” and ready to be embraced by the younger, edgier Hollywood after years in European exile, Welles in 1970 launched headlong into filming an idea that had been percolating for years, even though he had no complete script, no full cast, and no outside funding.

The autobiographical (though Welles rarely admitted it) concept involved a mythic, exiled filmmaker’s 70th birthday, around which the faithful and sycophantic would gather, while the fate of the director’s attempted comeback project lay in the balance. Naturally, this also described the shooting of “The Other Side of the Wind” as it carried on piecemeal for six years with a cast that included John Huston, Peter Bogdanovich, and Welles’s lover-collaborator Oja Kodar.

Watch Video: 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' Director Says Mister Rogers Is 'Empty From Our Culture'

Using a skeleton crew led by a young new cinematographer named Gary Graver, who cold-called Welles himself and whose own story as a dedicated worker bee shadows the film’s, Welles directed lush, vibrant scenes aping European art movies with Kodar (the film-within-the-film sequences). Alternatively, at a house in Arizona, one address over from the spread Antonioni blew up in “Zabriskie Point,” he shot the party sequences in a jagged documentary style.

Real-life details undergirded Welles’s narrative, in intensely psychological ways, never more so than that the director, through Huston’s character, played out onscreen his power-shifting relationship with acolyte and friend Bogdanovich, who wasn’t spared Welles’ ridicule. (Originally casting impersonator Rich Little in the role — an imitator as an imitator — was one such jab.)

Also Read: Netflix CEO Disses Cannes Film Fest After Streamer Pulls Out: There Are 'a Lot of Other Festivals'

Bogdanovich always helped his pal, though – his remembrances especially are tinged with the melancholy of loving a complex person. But at the point when money woes strained, Welles once more found himself the ever-loved cinema master — perpetual talk show guest, AFI honoree — but never to the tune of cash needed to realize a vision.

As Neville breezily relates an odyssey of chaos, inspiration, and impasses, he also makes expertly amusing, thematically-edited use of all manner of Welles footage (from movies, outtakes, television shows) so that the man himself becomes a chorus in his own story. The interviewee list of witnesses and collaborators is numerous, from the well-known to the unseen, their recollections and analyses sometimes differing, but nearly always intuitive.

The prime takeaway is of an irascibly charming, wounded and forceful genius both having the time of his life and sensing the gathering dusk. As the story eases into Welles’ final year, the most tantalizing question posed is whether he even wanted to finish catch-as-catch-can projects like “Wind”; was directing always about the exploration, the quest for “happy accidents,” and rarely the completion?

Eventually, Neville carries off his own winking director’s trick, with the help of Welles himself. Returning to footage used earlier, filmed by the Maysles brothers in Spain in the ’60s, of an energized Welles regaling a captive audience in a hotel lobby with his vision for what sounds like what eventually became “Wind,” the pitch turns enchantingly meta — that the future movie just might have to include them, in that moment, talking about it.

After the rollercoaster journey “They’ll Love Me” details, it’s enough to make one contemplate: Could Neville’s documentary be, in a sense, what Welles wanted “The Other Side of the Wind” to be all along? Someone else’s movie about Orson Welles’s movie about a fictional director’s movie which is inside another movie that’s ultimately about all movies?

Cheekily, Neville reveals he knows you’re thinking this, and it’s the perfect capper for his engaging hat-tip to a legend for whom the movies were always worth imagining, celebrating, and forever trying to get made.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Venice Film Festival 2018: Coen Brothers, Alfonso Cuaron, Julian Schnabel to Unveil New Work

Alfonso Cuarón's 'Roma' to Screen as New York Film Festival Centerpiece

Netflix Lands Cannes Award Winners 'Happy as Lazzaro' and 'Girl'

Kathryn Trosper Popper, 'Citizen Kane' Actress and Orson Welles' Assistant, Dies at 100

www.thewrap.com | 9/1/18

Mixed martial arts league Combate Americas is launching its own TV studio, TheWrap has learned exclusively, making it the first MMA organization to start a production company. Veteran foreign film producer Stan Jakubowicz will run La Jaula Studios, which will create content for both linear television and digital platforms.

“Our mission with La Jaula Studios is to tell the bold, untold and unfiltered stories of the real-life heroism behind Combate’s fighters and their communities,” the Hispanic fight league and media company’s president, Jacqueline Hernandez, told TheWrap. “Stan’s proven creative expertise and uncontainable passion for this sport make him a perfect fit to lead La Jaula.”

La Jaula Studios, which will be based in New York, plans to target its content toward Hispanic millennials and Generation Z. Shows and other short-form content will be produced in Spanish, English and Portuguese, which production taking place in Latin America, Brazil, Spain, Portugal and the U.S., among other regions.

Also Read: Alberto Del Rio: 90 Percent of WWE Wrestlers Have Never Been in a Real Fight

La Jaula Studios will offer a variety of programming, including lifestyle-documentary to scripted series, feature films, short-form digital, social and mobile content – and customized, sponsor-branded interstitials that will air during highly-watched Combate Americas live Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) television and digital events. This content will offer brands and advertisers a unique opportunity to connect with Combate Americas’ audience.

Jakubowicz’s film credits include “La Mujer de Mi Hermano,” “The German Doctor,” “Visitantes” and “El Inca.”

He has been Emmy-nominated as a television producer.

Also Read: ESPN Becomes Sole TV Home to UFC in $1.5 Billion Mega-Deal

Here are La Jaula’s initial projects, with descriptions in the company’s own words:

“Rootas “(working title, pictured above): A docuseries chronicling the lives of six Combate Americas fighters on their journey told first-hand through their eyes. The first episode will feature Mexican MMA superstar Erik “Goyito” Perez, as he heads to an unfamiliar world — Thailand — to train under legendary Muay Thai champion Buakaw Banchamek, a fighter whose unmatched speed and devastating knockout power in the ring has transformed him to one of the most sought-after commodities in the fight world.

“The Real Deal” A major motion picture and docuseries chronicling the life and career of Amanda “The Real Deal” Serrano, the only female fighter and only Puerto Rican fighter in history to win five world boxing championships in five different weight divisions, as she sets her sights on achieving another unprecedented feat — becoming the first fighter in history to win a major MMA world championship while simultaneously retaining a world boxing title.

Related stories from TheWrap:

UFC's Andrea 'KGB' Lee Apologizes After Defending Husband's Swastika Tattoo (Photo)

Former WWE Star Emma Reveals Why She Bailed on UK's Ring of Honor Tour

How Hulk Hogan Apologized to WWE Locker Room for N-Word Use (Audio)

www.thewrap.com | 8/21/18