Français | English | Español | Português

Luxembourg

Northern Ireland will prepare for their Euro 2020 qualifier against Germany by playing Luxembourg in a friendly match in September.
www.bbc.co.uk | 12/10/18
Plagued by traffic jams, one of the smallest countries in Europe will allow residents to ride free from 2020.
www.nytimes.com | 12/6/18
Ah, Luxembourg! City of romance! Or is it country of romance? It’s a confusing place. It’s even more confusing if you are passed the fuck out after a coke bender with your Russian mistress. There’s a slight possibility that that’s what happened to newlywed Kit Harington. Photos appearing to depict Kit in naked repose were […]
dlisted.com | 11/23/18
Bank of Beirut has acquired a small bank in Luxembourg as part of an overall strategy to establish a foothold in Europe, according to news media.
"Party's over, you microbes!" Viva Kids Films has debuted an official US trailer for the animated adventure Tall Tales, titled in full Tall Tales from the Magical Garden of Antoon Krings. This movie made in France & Luxembourg is directed by animator Arnaud Bouron & the creator of the book (titled "Drôles de petites bêtes" or "Funny little beasts") Antoon Krings. The story is about Apollo, a cricket saltimbanque with a big heart, who arrives at the "village of small animals". He wastes no time disrupting the simple life of the Kingdom, on the eve of the jubilee of the Queen, and gets wrapped up in a conspiracy. The English voice cast features Justin Long and Kate Mara. The various insect characters in this remind me of A Bug's Life or Antz, it all seems a bit too similar to me. Maybe it's still fun to watch? Especially if you have kids, I suppose. Here's the new US trailer (+ intl. ...
A key player on the champions once got 40 percent off wings as a perk.
www.nytimes.com | 11/6/18
Grand Duchess of Luxembourg Maria Teresa arrived at Baabda Palace Monday morning to meet with President Michel Aoun, according to a tweet from the Lebanese Presidency.
Grand Duchess of Luxembourg Maria Teresa arrived in Lebanon Sunday evening for a short visit with Lebanese and humanitarian officials, the state-run National News Agency reported.

Eighty-seven films have qualified in the 2018 Oscars race for Best Foreign Language Film, the Academy announced on Monday.

The number is five less than last year’s record of 92 entries, but significantly larger than the 60-odd qualifying films that were the norm only a few years ago. The 2018 race is also expected to be one of the most competitive in years, with a number of esteemed international directors and award-winning films competing for only nine spots on the shortlist and five nominations.

Los Angeles-based volunteers from all branches of the Academy will now watch all the eligible films at AMPAS screenings at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills and the Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. This year, the Academy has made it easier to qualify to vote, dropping the number of films each voter must see from 17 or 18 down to 12 and eliminating the color-coded groups that made each voter choose from a specific group of films to which he or she had been assigned.

Also Read: Academy Makes More Changes to Open Up Oscars Foreign Language Voting (Exclusive)

The Mexican entry, Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma,” is the clear frontrunner, since it is also considered a strong contender for a Best Picture nomination. (In Oscars history, six films have been nominated in both categories, the last one being “Amour” in 2011.)

But the Polish entry, “Cold War,” is the new film from Pawel Pawlikowski, whose last film, “Ida,” won the foreign-language Oscar; it too is considered a likely nominee. So is the Lebanese entry, Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum,” a powerful drama about a young boy in the slums of Beirut who sues his parents for bringing him into the world.

Two other directors are recent winners in the category, Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck with the German entry “Never Look Away” (his “The Lives of Others” won in 2007) and Laszlo Nemes for Hungary’s entry, “Sunset” (his last film, “Son of Saul,” won in 2016).

Also in the race: recent nominees Rithy Panh (“Graves Without a Name,” Cambodia) and Ciro Guerra (“Birds of Passage,” a Colombian film co-directed with his ex-wife, Cristina Gallego).

Also Read: Oscars Foreign Language Race 2018: Complete List of Submissions (So Far)

Other strong Oscars contenders include Lee Chang-dong’s “Burning, which is vying to become the first South Korean film ever to be nominated; Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters,” which won the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival; Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s “The Wild Pear Tree,” the Turkish entry; Lukas Dhont’s “Girl,” which won the acting award in the Un Certain Regard section at Cannes; and Matteo Garrone’s “Dogman,” which took the best-actor award in Cannes’ main competition.

Entries from Ukraine, Egypt, Sweden, Denmark, Israel, the U.K., Spain, Paraguay and several other countries are also contending for the prize.

Malawi and Niger have submitted films for the first time.

Official Academy screenings will begin on Oct. 15 and run through Dec. 10. At that point, the six films that have received the highest average scores from the voters will advance to a nine-film shortlist, along with three additional films chosen by an executive committee.

Also Read: Larry Karaszewski and Diane Weyermann to Replace Mark Johnson as Oscars Foreign-Language Heads (Exclusive)

TheWrap has compiled a complete list of the qualifying films, with descriptions and links to trailers when available.

The list of qualifying films:

Afghanistan, “Rona Azim’s Mother,” Jamshid Mahmoudi, director;

Algeria, “Until the End of Time,” Yasmine Chouikh, director;

Argentina, “El Ángel,” Luis Ortega, director;

Armenia, “Spitak,” Alexander Kott, director;

Australia, “Jirga,” Benjamin Gilmour, director;

Austria, “The Waldheim Waltz,” Ruth Beckermann, director;

Bangladesh, “No Bed of Roses,” Mostofa Sarwar Farooki, director;

Belarus, “Crystal Swan,” Darya Zhuk, director;

Belgium, “Girl,” Lukas Dhont, director;

Bolivia, “The Goalkeeper,” Rodrigo “Gory” Patiño, director;

Bosnia and Herzegovina, “Never Leave Me,” Aida Begi?, director;

Brazil, “The Great Mystical Circus,” Carlos Diegues, director;

Bulgaria, “Omnipresent,” Ilian Djevelekov, director;

Cambodia, “Graves without a Name,” Rithy Panh, director;

Canada, “Family Ties,” Sophie Dupuis, director;

Chile, “…And Suddenly the Dawn,” Silvio Caiozzi, director;

China, “Hidden Man,” Jiang Wen, director;

Colombia, “Birds of Passage,” Cristina Gallego, Ciro Guerra, directors;

Costa Rica, “Medea,” Alexandra Latishev, director;

Croatia, “The Eighth Commissioner,” Ivan Salaj, director;

Czech Republic, “Winter Flies,” Olmo Omerzu, director;

Denmark, “The Guilty,” Gustav Möller, director;

Dominican Republic, “Cocote,” Nelson Carlo De Los Santos Arias, director;

Ecuador, “A Son of Man,” Jamaicanoproblem, director;

Egypt, “Yomeddine,” A.B. Shawky, director;

Estonia, “Take It or Leave It,” Liina Trishkina-Vanhatalo, director;

Finland, “Euthanizer,” Teemu Nikki, director;

France, “Memoir of War,” Emmanuel Finkiel, director;

Georgia, “Namme,” Zaza Khalvashi, director;

Germany, “Never Look Away,” Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, director;

Greece, “Polyxeni,” Dora Masklavanou, director;

Hong Kong, “Operation Red Sea,” Dante Lam, director;

Hungary, “Sunset,” László Nemes, director;

Iceland, “Woman at War,” Benedikt Erlingsson, director;

India, “Village Rockstars,” Rima Das, director;

Indonesia, “Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts,” Mouly Surya, director;

Iran, “No Date, No Signature,” Vahid Jalilvand, director;

Iraq, “The Journey,” Mohamed Jabarah Al-Daradji, director;

Israel, “The Cakemaker,” Ofir Raul Graizer, director;

Italy, “Dogman,” Matteo Garrone, director;

Japan, “Shoplifters,” Hirokazu Kore-eda, director;

Kazakhstan, “Ayka,” Sergey Dvortsevoy, director;

Kenya, “Supa Modo,” Likarion Wainaina, director;

Kosovo, “The Marriage,” Blerta Zeqiri, director;

Latvia, “To Be Continued,” Ivars Seleckis, director;

Lebanon, “Capernaum,” Nadine Labaki, director;

Lithuania, “Wonderful Losers: A Different World,” Arunas Matelis, director;

Luxembourg, “Gutland,” Govinda Van Maele, director;

Macedonia, “Secret Ingredient,” Gjorce Stavreski, director;

Malawi, “The Road to Sunrise,” Shemu Joyah, director;

Mexico, “Roma,” Alfonso Cuarón, director;

Montenegro, “Iskra,” Gojko Berkuljan, director;

Morocco, “Burnout,” Nour-Eddine Lakhmari, director;

Nepal, “Panchayat,” Shivam Adhikari, director;

Netherlands, “The Resistance Banker,” Joram Lürsen, director;

New Zealand, “Yellow Is Forbidden,” Pietra Brettkelly, director;

Niger, “The Wedding Ring,” Rahmatou Keïta, director;

Norway, “What Will People Say,” Iram Haq, director;

Pakistan, “Cake,” Asim Abbasi, director;

Palestine, “Ghost Hunting,” Raed Andoni, director;

Panama, “Ruben Blades Is Not My Name,” Abner Benaim, director;

Paraguay, “The Heiresses,” Marcelo Martinessi, director;

Peru, “Eternity,” Oscar Catacora, director;

Philippines, “Signal Rock,” Chito S. Roño, director;

Poland, “Cold War,” Pawel Pawlikowski, director;

Portugal, “Pilgrimage,” João Botelho, director;

Romania, “I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians,” Radu Jude, director;

Russia, “Sobibor,” Konstantin Khabensky, director;

Serbia, “Offenders,” Dejan Zecevic, director;

Singapore, “Buffalo Boys,” Mike Wiluan, director;

Slovakia, “The Interpreter,” Martin Šulík, director;

Slovenia, “Ivan,” Janez Burger, director;

South Africa, “Sew the Winter to My Skin,” Jahmil X.T. Qubeka, director;

South Korea, “Burning,” Lee Chang-dong, director;

Spain, “Champions,” Javier Fesser, director;

Sweden, “Border,” Ali Abbasi, director;

Switzerland, “Eldorado,” Markus Imhoof, director;

Taiwan, “The Great Buddha+,” Hsin-Yao Huang, director;

Thailand, “Malila The Farewell Flower,” Anucha Boonyawatana, director;

Tunisia, “Beauty and the Dogs,” Kaouther Ben Hania, director;

Turkey, “The Wild Pear Tree,” Nuri Bilge Ceylan, director;

Ukraine, “Donbass,” Sergei Loznitsa, director;

United Kingdom, “I Am Not a Witch,” Rungano Nyoni, director;

Uruguay, “Twelve-Year Night,” Álvaro Brechner, director;

Venezuela, “The Family,” Gustavo Rondón Córdova, director;

Vietnam, “The Tailor,” Buu Loc Tran, Kay Nguyen, directors;

Yemen, “10 Days before the Wedding,” Amr Gamal, director.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Sunset' Film Review: 'Son of Saul' Director Keeps His Characters, and Audience, Off Balance

'Capernaum' Director Left Out 'Shocking' Details About Kids on the Streets That Audiences Couldn't Handle

'Cold War' Film Review: Romance in Postwar Europe Is Ravishing and Haunted

www.thewrap.com | 10/8/18
Luxembourg champions F91 Dudelange suffer a narrow defeat by AC Milan in their first Europa League group game.
www.bbc.co.uk | 9/21/18
The bloc’s executive arm had been investigating whether Luxembourg had granted McDonald’s overly generous tax breaks.
www.nytimes.com | 9/19/18
The Latest on Europe's migrant crisis (all times local): 6 p.m. Leaders of France, Belgium, Luxembourg and The Netherlands have met to coordinate their policies on migration and Brexit negotiations, among other European issues.
www.foxnews.com | 9/6/18
Paris has seen a marked rise in urban beekeeping, with more than 1,000 hives atop landmark buildings as well as in community gardens across the city.
www.nytimes.com | 8/24/18
The research by a British-based personal finance website showed that in Luxembourg, a night in a luxury hotel costs just £117 on average but a stay in hospital is 12 times more at £1,360 per day.
The research by a British-based personal finance website showed that in Luxembourg, a night in a luxury hotel costs just £117 on average but a stay in hospital is 12 times more at £1,360 per day.
Assadollah Assadi allegedly gave a Belgian-Iranian couple a bomb in Luxembourg for an attack against an Iranian opposition group in France. The 46-year-old diplomat was arrested in Germany at the beginning of July.
www.dw.com | 7/11/18
Did you think Tesla could move past braking complaints just because it addressed the issue with the Model 3? Luxembourg certainly doesn't. The European country's testing and standards body ILNAS has put itself at odds with Tesla after conducting an u...
www.engadget.com | 7/8/18
The European Court of Justice in Luxembourg has ruled that a gay Romanian-American couple is entitled to the same residency rights as other married couples in the European Union.
www.foxnews.com | 6/5/18
A show at Luxembourg & Dayan focuses on rarely seen works by the mid-century artist.
www.wsj.com | 4/30/18
The Latest on the decisive electoral victory of Hungary Prime Minister Viktor Orban and his right-wing Fidesz party (all times local): 10:45 a.m.
www.foxnews.com | 4/9/18
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket successfully launched a quartet of O3b communications satellites into orbit today (March 9) for the Luxembourg-based satellite operator SES Networks.
Dead Cross will be out touring Europe, the UK and Russia this summer. Dates for that trek include: 06/02 Barcelona, SPA – Primavera Sound 06/03 Nimes, FRA – This Is Not A Love Song 06/05 Bologna, ITA – Estragon Club 06/06 Milan, ITA – Alcatraz 06/07 Interlaken, SWI – Greenfield 06/10 Donington, UK – Download Festival 06/12 Luxembourg, ... Read More/Discuss on Metal Underground.com

Netflix has acquired the Sundance animated film “White Fang,” marking the first acquisition deal for the streaming platform out of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

The service is set to release the film later this year in territories including the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Southeast Asia, Japan, South Korea, U.K., Eastern Europe, India, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Academy Award winner Alexandre Espigares directed the film, with a voice cast of Nick Offerman, Rashida Jones, Paul Giamatti and Eddie Spears. Dominique Monfery, Philippe Lioret and Serge Frydman served as writers on the film.

Also Read: 'White Fang' Film Review: Jack London Classic Gets Sturdy, Simplistic Animated Retelling

“White Fang” is based on Jack London’s classic novel of the same name, which is an adventure-filled tale set during the Klondike Gold Rush of the 1890s. It follows White Fang, a wolf dog who was injured and abandoned who ends up dog-fighting in Fort Yukon. He develops a friendship with two humans who treat him with kindness and respect.

Producers on the film are Clément Calvet, Jérémie Fajner, Lilian Eche, Christel Henon, Marc Turtletaub and Peter Saraf. Superprod, Bidibul Productions and Big Beach’s “White Fang” is also a French/Luxembourg/USA co-production.

Also Read: Andrea Riseborough's 'Nancy' Sells to Samuel Goldwyn Films

Netflix came to the Sundance Film Festival with titles to screen — it debuted the Gloria Allred documentary “Seeing Allred” and the comedy “A Futile and Stupid Gesture,” but this is the platform’s first acquisition from the festival.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jesse Peretz Sundance Hit 'Juliet, Naked' Goes to Lionsgate, Roadside Attractions

The Orchard Grabs Domestic Rights to Sundance Drama 'We The Animals'

Watch the Terrifying Trailer for Sundance Horror Film 'Hereditary' (Video)

www.thewrap.com | 2/20/18
BERLIN — France’s Special Touch Studios will team with Luxembourg’s Paul Thiltges Distributions to produce “Allah Is Not Obliged,” an animated feature based on a tale from Côte d’Ivoire’s writer Ahmadou Kourouma. “Allah is Not Obliged” will pe pitched at the upcoming Cartoon Movie animation pitch hub, which runs March 7-9 in the French city […]
variety.com | 2/20/18

U.S. figure skater Adam Rippon just won a bronze medal for his part in the figure skating team event at the Pyeongchang Winter Games, realizing a dream at least 15 years in the making.

In an unearthed video from 2003, a then-13-year-old Rippon let local Pennsylvania TV station WNEP know he had his sights on the Olympics.

“It was the first time I did a triple in competition, so I was really excited as soon as I did that,” he said about a competition in Luxembourg, where he placed second in his short program and first in his long program.

Also Read: Ratings: 'The Bachelor' Dumps 'Celebrity Big Brother'

That trip also included a visit to the Olympic museum in Switzerland.

“When you see, like, all these things about other people who have won the Olympics and everything, you think that you’ve done a great thing,” Rippon said. “But you’re still so far away.”

Prophetic words for someone who says he felt like he missed out on the last Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia in 2014.

Also Read: Chicago TV Station Apologizes After Confusing PF Chang's and Pyeongchang (Video)

He told NBC he and teammate Mirai Nagasu “were eating In-N-Out because we were so upset we weren’t at the Olympic games.”

“The Olympics are truly magical because we came out here tonight … we gave each other a hug and said,  ‘Mirai, we’re here! We did it!'” he said during the interview over the weekend.

Watch his team skate here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Super Bowl, Olympics and 'This Is Us' Make NBC No. 1 in Viewership for the First Time in 16 Years

Ratings: NBC's Olympics (Figure) Skates Circles Around 'Celebrity Big Brother,' 'Shark Tank'

NBC Apologizes to Koreans for Japan WWII Comments During Olympics Opening Ceremony

10 Things to Watch If You Hate Valentine's Day, From 'Black Mirror' to the Olympics (Photos)

www.thewrap.com | 2/13/18
Senegal will play Bosnia and Herzegovina and Luxembourg in friendly internationals ahead of the World Cup in Russia later this year.
www.bbc.co.uk | 2/10/18
Xavier Bettel is at Cape Canaveral in Florida to see his nation's latest space project go into orbit.
www.bbc.co.uk | 1/31/18
 SpaceX has launched a Falcon 9 rocket loaded with a geocommunications satellite commissioned by the Government of Luxembourg. The satellite, created by Orbital STK and to be operated by SES, will support humanitarian and military operations for Luxembourg, among other communications functions. The rocket took off from Cape Canaveral on Wednesday, a day after its initial planned launch. The… Read More
techcrunch.com | 1/31/18
 SpaceX’s launch live stream has already started for its GovSat-1 mission, which is launching a satellite from the government of Luxembourg into geostationary transfer orbit. The launch window opens at 4:25 PM EST and will not include a recovery attempt for the Falcon 9 first stage, which has been used once before during a mission in 2017. Read More
techcrunch.com | 1/31/18

James (Jon) Castle - 7 December 1950 to 12 January 2018

Over four decades Captain Jon Castle navigated Greenpeace ships by the twin stars of ‘right and wrong’, defending the environment and promoting peace. Greenpeace chronicler, Rex Weyler, recounts a few of the stories that made up an extraordinary life.

Captain Jon Castle onboard the MV Sirius, 1 May 1996

James (Jon) Castle first opened his eyes virtually at sea. He was born 7 December 1950 in Cobo Bay on the Channel Island of Guernsey, UK. He grew up in a house known locally as Casa del Mare, the closest house on the island to the sea, the second son of Robert Breedlove Castle and Mary Constance Castle. 

Young Jon Castle loved the sea and boats. He worked on De Ile de Serk, a cargo boat that supplied nearby Sark island, and he studied at the University of Southampton to become an officer in the Merchant Navy. 

Jon became a beloved skipper of Greenpeace ships. He sailed on many campaigns and famously skippered two ships during Greenpeace’s action against Shell’s North Sea oil platform, Brent Spar. During his activist career, Jon spelt his name as "Castel" to avoid unwanted attention on his family.

Right and wrong

Jon had two personal obsessions: he loved books and world knowledge and was extremely well-read.  He also loved sacred sites and spent personal holidays walking to stone circles, standing stones, and holy wells.  

As a young man, Jon became acquainted with the Quaker tradition, drawn by their dedication to peace, civil rights, and direct social action. In 1977, when Greenpeace purchased their first ship - the Aberdeen trawler renamed, the Rainbow Warrior - Jon signed on as first mate, working with skipper Peter Bouquet and activists Susi Newborn, Denise Bell and Pete Wilkinson.

In 1978, Wilkinson and Castle learned of the British government dumping radioactive waste at sea in the deep ocean trench off the coast of Spain in the Sea of Biscay. In July, the Rainbow Warrior followed the British ship, Gem, south from the English coast, carrying a load of toxic, radioactive waste barrels. The now-famous confrontation during which the Gem crew dropped barrels onto a Greenpeace inflatable boat, ultimately changed maritime law and initiated a ban on toxic dumping at sea.

After being arrested by Spanish authorities, Castle and Bouquet staged a dramatic escape from La Coru?a harbour at night, without running lights, and returned the Greenpeace ship to action. Crew member Simone Hollander recalls, as the ship entered Dublin harbour in 1978, Jon cheerfully insisting that the entire crew help clean the ship's bilges before going ashore, an action that not only built camaraderie among the crew, but showed a mariner's respect for the ship itself. In 1979, they brought the ship to Amsterdam and participated in the first Greenpeace International meeting.

In 1980 Castle and the Rainbow Warrior crew confronted Norwegian and Spanish whaling ships, were again arrested by Spanish authorities, and brought into custody in the El Ferrol naval base.

The Rainbow Warrior remained in custody for five months, as the Spanish government demanded 10 million pesetas to compensate the whaling company. On the night of November 8, 1980, the Rainbow Warrior, with Castle at the helm, quietly escaped the naval base, through the North Atlantic, and into port in Jersey.

In 1995, Castle skippered the MV Greenpeace during the campaign against French nuclear testing in the Pacific and led a flotilla into New Zealand to replace the original Rainbow Warrior that French agents bombed in Auckland in 1985.

Over the years, Castle became legendary for his maritime skills, courage, compassion, commitment, and for his incorruptible integrity. "Environmentalism: That does not mean a lot to me," he once said, "I am here because of what is right and wrong. Those words are good enough for me."

Brent Spar   Action at Brent Spar Oil Rig in the North Sea, 16 June 1995

One of the most successful Greenpeace campaigns of all time began in the summer of 1995 when Shell Oil announced a plan to dump a floating oil storage tank, containing toxic petroleum residue, into the North Atlantic. Castle signed on as skipper of the Greenpeace vessel Moby Dick, out of Lerwick, Scotland. A month later, on 30 April 1995, Castle and other activists occupied the Brent Spar and called for a boycott of Shell service stations.

When Shell security and British police sprayed the protesters with water cannons, images flooded across world media, demonstrations broke out across Europe, and on May 15, at the G7 summit, German chancellor Helmut Kohl publicly protested to British Prime Minister John Major. In June, 11 nations, at the Oslo and Paris Commission meetings, called for a moratorium on sea disposal of offshore installations.

After three weeks, British police managed to evict Castle and the other occupiers and held them briefly in an Aberdeen jail. When Shell and the British government defied public sentiment and began towing the Spar to the disposal site, consumers boycotted Shell stations across Europe. Once released, Castle took charge of the chartered Greenpeace vessel Altair and continued to pursue the Brent Spar towards the dumping ground. Castle called on the master of another Greenpeace ship, fitted with a helideck, to alter course and rendezvous with him. Using a helicopter, protesters re-occupied the Spar and cut the wires to the detonators of scuppering charges.

One of the occupiers, young recruit Eric Heijselaar, recalls: "One of the first people I met as I climbed on board was a red-haired giant of a man grinning broadly at us. My first thought was that he was a deckhand, or maybe the bosun. So I asked if he knew whether a cabin had been assigned to me yet. He gave me a lovely warm smile, and reassured me that, yes, a cabin had been arranged. At dinner I found out that he was Jon Castle, not a deckhand, not the bosun, but the captain. And what a captain!"

Again, British naval police evicted the occupiers, but Castle and the crew kept up pursuit. Then the Spar suddenly altered course, heading towards Norway. Shell had given up. The company announced that Brent Spar would be cleaned out and used as a foundation for a new ferry terminal. Three years later, in 1998, the Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR) passed a ban on dumping oil installations into the North Sea.

"There was no question among the crew who had made this possible, who had caused this to happen," Heijselaar recalls. "It was Jon Castle. His quiet enthusiasm and the trust he put into people made this crew one of the best I ever saw. He always knew exactly what he wanted out of a campaign, how to gain momentum, and he always found the right words to explain his philosophies. He was that rare combination, both a mechanic and a mystic. And above all he was a very loving, kind human being."

Moruroa

After the Brent Spar campaign, Castle returned to the South Pacific on the Rainbow Warrior II, to obstruct a proposed French nuclear test in the Moruroa atoll. Expecting the French to occupy their ship, Castle and engineer, Luis Manuel Pinto da Costa, rigged the steering mechanism to be controlled from the crow's-nest. When French commandos boarded the ship, Castle stationed himself in the crow's-nest, cut away the access ladder and greased the mast so that the raiders would have difficulty arresting him.

Eventually, the commandos cut a hole into the engine-room and severed cables controlling the engine, radio, and steering mechanism, making Castle's remote control system worthless. They towed the Rainbow Warrior II to the island of Hao, as three other protest vessels arrived. 

Three thousand demonstrators gathered in the French port of Papeete, demanding that France abandon the tests. Oscar Temaru - leader of Tavini Huiraatira, an anti-nuclear, pro-independence party - who had been aboard the Rainbow Warrior II when it was raided, welcomed anti-testing supporters from Britain, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, Sweden, Canada, Germany, Brazil, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, the Philippines, and American Samoa. Eventually, France ended their tests, and atmospheric nuclear testing in the world's oceans stopped once and for all.

“Moral courage”

Through these extraordinary missions, Jon Castle advocated "self-reflection" not only for individual activists, but for the organisation that he loved. Activists, Castle maintained, required "moral courage." He cautioned, "Don't seek approval. Someone has to be way out in front... illuminating territory in advance of the main body of thought."

He opposed "corporatism" in activist organisation and urged Greenpeace to avoid becoming "over-centralised or compartmentalised."  He felt that activist decisions should emerge from the actions themselves, not in an office. We can't fight industrialism with "money, numbers, and high-tech alone," he once wrote in a personal manifesto. Organisations have to avoid traps of "self-perpetuation" and focus on the job "upsetting powerful forces, taking on multinationals and the military-industrial complex."

He recalled that Greenpeace had become popular "because a gut message came through to the thirsty hearts of poor suffering people ... feeling the destruction around them."  Activists, Castle felt, required "freedom of expression, spontaneity [and] an integrated lifestyle."  An activist organisation should foster a "feeling of community" and exhibit "moral courage." Castle felt that social change activists had to "question the materialistic, consumerist lifestyle that drives energy overuse, the increasingly inequitable world economic tyranny that creates poverty and drives environmental degradation," and must maintain "honour, courage and the creative edge."

Well loved hero

Susi Newborn, who was there to welcome Jon aboard the Rainbow Warrior way back in 1977, and who gave the ship its name, wrote about her friend with whom she felt "welded at the heart: He was a Buddhist and a vegetarian and had an earring in his ear. He liked poetry and classical music and could be very dark, but also very funny. Once, I cut his hair as he downed a bottle or two of rum reciting The Second Coming by Yeats."

Newborn recalls Castle insisting that women steer the ships in and out of port because, "they got it right, were naturals." She recalls a night at sea, Castle "lashed to the wheel facing one of the biggest storms of last century head on. I was flung about my cabin like a rag doll until I passed out. We never talked about the storm, as if too scared to summon up the behemoth we had encountered. A small handwritten note pinned somewhere in the mess, the sole acknowledgment of a skipper to his six-person crew: ‘Thank You.’” Others remember Castle as the Greenpeace captain that could regularly be found in the galley doing kitchen duty.

In 2008, with the small yacht Musichana, Castle and Pete Bouquet staged a two-man invasion of Diego Garcia island to protest the American bomber base there and the UK's refusal to allow evicted Chagos Islanders to return to their homes. They anchored in the lagoon and radioed the British Indian Ocean Territories officials on the island to tell them they and the US Air Force were acting in breach of international law and United Nations resolutions. When arrested, Castle politely lectured his captors on their immoral and illegal conduct.

In one of his final actions, as he battled with his failing health, Castle helped friends in Scotland operate a soup kitchen, quietly prepping food and washing up behind the scenes.  

Upon hearing of his passing, Greenpeace ships around the world - the Arctic Sunrise, the Esperanza, and the Rainbow Warrior - flew their flags at half mast.

Jon is fondly remembered by his brother David, ex-wife Caroline, their son, Morgan Castle, born in 1982, and their daughter, Eowyn Castle, born in 1984. Morgan has a daughter of eight months Flora, and and Eowyn has a daughter, Rose, who is 2.   

Increasing numbers of U.K. citizens in Luxembourg are seeking citizenship in preparation for Brexit. One big hurdle: mastering the country’s obscure tongue-twisting language.
www.wsj.com | 1/19/18
Increasing numbers of U.K. citizens in Luxembourg are seeking citizenship in preparation for Brexit. One big hurdle: mastering the country’s obscure tongue-twisting language.
www.wsj.com | 1/18/18

Naeem Khan’s latest bride is ready for an after-party worthy of Studio 54 and Vera Wang’s is feeling a touch of baroque romance.

During a round of bridal shows in New York, Wang showed her Fall 2018 collection via appointment and black-and-white look book shot by Patrick Demarchelier in Paris’ Jardin du Luxembourg.

NAEEM KHAN

Khan staged a runway show in his cozy garment district atelier, complete with huge disco balls and a dance party at the end with models dressed in minis sparkling with gold and silver sequins and crystals.

Antoine Deltour should have been awarded whistleblower protections, says Luxembourg's top court.
www.bbc.co.uk | 1/11/18
[New Times] For the ninth time, Rwanda is showcasing its tourist attractions at the Vakantiebeurs tourism exhibition, the largest tourism exhibition in the Benelux - Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg - this week.
allafrica.com | 1/10/18

Luxembourg – Uber should be classified as a transport service and regulated like other taxi operators, the European Union’s top court said in a landmark ruling on Wednesday that could impact other online...

www.nationnews.com | 12/20/17
If you want to cram city and countryside breaks into one short jaunt, Luxembourg is the perfect place
www.mirror.co.uk | 12/20/17