Français | English | Español | Português

Hungary Sport

In his latest BBC Sport column, former F1 driver Jolyon Palmer explores how reluctant 'wingman' Valtteri Bottas diced with controversy in Hungary.
www.bbc.co.uk | 7/31/18
In his latest BBC Sport column, former F1 driver Jolyon Palmer explores how reluctant 'wingman' Valtteri Bottas diced with controversy in Hungary.
www.bbc.co.uk | 7/31/18

We now know what Cate Blanchett’s jury thought of the films that screened at this year’s Cannes Film Festival: “a very strong year,” she said at the jury’s festival-ending press conference. And we know what buyers thought of the festival lineup: not bad, judging by the deals.

But what will Oscar voters think?

That’s always a tricky question, because the connection between the world’s most prestigious film festival and the world’s most celebrated film award can fluctuate wildly. In 2011, for example, three of the films that screened at the festival — “The Artist,” “The Tree of Life” and “Midnight in Paris” — landed Best Picture nominations, with “The Artist” winning.

But the success rate hasn’t approached that since then, although 2016 had an impressive across-the-board showing: One Best Picture nominee (“Hell of High Water”), the Best Foreign Language Film winner (“The Salesman”), six other nominees in the Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Foreign Language Film and Best Animated Feature categories and eight more films submitted by their home countries in the foreign language race.

Also Read: 'Shoplifters' Wins Palme d'Or at 2018 Cannes Film Festival

Last year, though, was more typical: two foreign nominees (“The Square” and “Loveless”), one supporting actor nominee (Willem Dafoe for “The Florida Project”) and one documentary nominee (“Faces Places”), with no winners among them.

Realistically, this year’s crop of Cannes films will probably fare similarly once Oscar voters get a look at them. The only film that screened at the festival or one of its sidebars that has a significant chance of landing a Best Picture nomination is Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman,” which could well be in the conversation once U.S. audiences get a look at it later this summer.

Lee’s film, which mixes humor with incendiary anger and looks at the state of America today through a story set in the 1970s, is timely enough and strong enough to be a real player, though it will likely divide critics and audiences in America more than it did in Cannes.

Also Read: 'BlacKkKlansman' Cannes Review: Spike Lee Looks Back - and Forward - in Anger

Otherwise, Ron Howard’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” seems destined for below-the-line categories at best, while a surge of attention for Paul Dano’s understated “Wildlife,” which premiered at Sundance but also screened in Cannes’ Critics’ Week sidebar, could make it a dark-horse contender in the adapted screenplay category.

A few Cannes documentaries could also have a shot, foremost among them Kevin Macdonald’s “Whitney,” which drew headlines out of Cannes for its allegations that Whitney Houston was sexually abused as a child by a relative. Wim Wenders’ “Pope Francis – A Man of His Word” will likely be in the conversation, and so might be “The State Against Mandela and the Others” and “Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blache.”

But really, the most fruitful connection between Cannes and the Oscars this year will likely come in the foreign language category. Only six of the 93 countries that submitted films to the Oscars last year chose Cannes entries, but we could easily see double that many submissions come from this year’s festival.

While the individual committees that select each country’s entry can be making their decisions on the basis of politics, cronyism and lots of other factors, a Cannes berth is a powerful sign that the film might have international interest.

Also Read: 'Capharnaum' Film Review: Nadine Labaki's Searing Drama Brings Tears, Ovations

Among the no-brainer selections: Lebanon’s “Capharnaum,” the Jury Prize winner and the film that received the longest and loudest ovation of the festival; Poland’s “Cold War” from director Pawel Pawlikowski, whose last film, “Ida,” won the foreign language Oscar; Belgium’s “Girl,” which won the Camera d’Or and the Un Certain Regard performance award; Colombia’s “Birds of Passage,” from a director (Ciro Guerra) whose last film was an Oscar nominee; and Turkey’s “The Wild Pear Tree,” whose director, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, has been responsible for four previous Turkish submissions.

Kenya’s “Rafiki,” a same-sex romance that is the first Kenyan film ever accepted to the Oscars, would be an easy choice if it hadn’t been banned in its home country — though if the submitting committee is independent enough to choose it, the ban could give it a boost. First-time director A.B. Shawky’s “Yomeddine” seems likely to be the Egyptian entry, while the Cannes acting award that went to Samal Yesyamova should be enough to put “Ayka” at the top of Kazakhstan’s submission list.

The Icelandic film “Woman at War,” which was bought by Magnolia for the U.S., comes from Benedikt Erlingsson, whose brilliant “Of Horses and Men” was the country’s 2013 submission, though it may have been too weird for Oscar voters. Portugal’s soccer story “Diamantino” seems a logical choice, as does Hungary’s “One Day.”

Countries like France and Italy always have a plethora of choices, which holds true this year even if they don’t consider anything except Cannes movies. Italy, for example, could opt for Matteo Garrone’s “Dogman,” which won the festival’s best actor award and is from the director of the acclaimed “Gomorrah” (which Oscar voters didn’t go for); or Alice Rohrwacher’s “Happy as Lazzaro,” a fable that won the screenplay award and was widely thought to be a real Palme d’Or contender.

Also Read: 'Happy as Lazzaro' Film Review: Alice Rohrwacher Charts the Course of a Holy Fool

And France has a variety of possibilities, including Christophe Honore’s “Sorry Angel,” Stephane Brize’s “At War,” Vanessa Filho’s “Angel Face,” Gilles Lellouche’s audience-friendly “Sink or Swim,” Camille Vidal-Naquet’s “Sauvage” or even Gaspar Noe’s hallucinatory “Climax.”

But France could also opt for Eva Husson’s “Girls of the Sun,” a tough but mainstream war movie about an all-female unit fighting terrorists. It didn’t fare well with Cannes critics, but it could easily become a favorite of the Academy’s foreign language voters.

The biggest question marks might surround the Asian films. Japan, China and South Korea swing between submitting critical favorites and trying to second-guess Oscar voters by choosing less daring movies or big epics. So while China has strong candidates in Jia Zhang-Ke’s “Ash Is Purest White” or Bi Gan’s rapturously received “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” it’s anybody’s guess as to whether their selection committee will deem those films acceptable. Likewise with South Korea and Lee Chang-dong’s “Burning,” which was clearly the hit of the festival, and Japan with Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters,” which won the Palme d’Or.

Also Read: 'Shoplifters' Cannes Review: Is the Seventh Time a Charm for Hirokazu Kore-eda?

The director of the last of those films has been down this road before. In an interview with TheWrap in 2014, Kore-eda admitted that he was disappointed when “Like Father, Like Son,” which won the Jury Prize in Cannes, was passed over in favor of “The Great Passage” when Japan made its 2013 Oscar submission.

“But honestly, given the track record of how that committee in Japan decides on their films, I was not surprised,” he said. “The committee isn’t particularly interested in the world’s criteria on these films.”

Oh, one more thing:

Lars von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built”? Not a chance.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Asia Argento Condemns Harvey Weinstein During Cannes Awards: 'This Festival Was His Hunting Ground' (Video)

Is the Cannes Film Festival in Decline? Not to the French

Netflix Lands Cannes Award Winners 'Happy as Lazzaro' and 'Girl'

www.thewrap.com | 5/20/18

Hollywood’s biggest night of the year is a wrap!

Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water cleaned up at the 90th Academy Awards, winning four Oscars including the night’s biggest honor, Best Picture.

In the lead actor categories, Frances McDormand and Gary Oldman dominated — as expected — for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri and Darkest Hour respectively. McDormand’s costar Sam Rockwell won Best Supporting Actor, while I, Tonya‘s Allison Janney netted Best Supporting Actress.

Box office sensation Get Out didn’t go home empty-handed despite losing out on Best Picture — its director/writer Jordan Peele won Best Original Screenplay.

See the full list of the 2018 Academy Award winners below.

Best Picture
Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Actor
Timothee Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day Lewis, Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out
Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington, Roman J. Isreal, Esq

Best Actress
Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
Meryl Streep, The Post

Best Supporting Actress
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water
Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread

Best Supporting Actor
Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson, Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Director
Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan
Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson
The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro

Be sure to check out PEOPLE’s full Academy Awards coverage to get the latest news on Hollywood’s big night.

Best Animated Feature Film
The Breadwinner
Coco
Ferdinand
The Boss Baby
Loving Vincent

Original Screenplay
The Big Sick
Get Out
Lady Bird
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Adapted Screenplay
Call Me By Your Name
The Disaster Artist
Logan
Molly’s Game
Mudbound

Original Song
“Mighty River,” Mudbound
“Mystery of Love,” Call Me By Your Name
“Remember Me,” Coco
“Stand up For Something,” Marshall
“This is Me,” The Greatest Showman

Best Foreign Language Film
The Insult, Lebanon
Loveless, Russia
On Body and Soul, Hungary
The Square, Sweden
A Fantastic Woman, Chile

RELATED: James Franco Out! Greta Gerwig In! Biggest Surprises and Snubs of 2018 Oscar Nominations

Best Documentary Short Subject
Edith and Eddie
Heaven is a Traffic Jam on the 405
Heroin(e)
Knife Skills
Traffic Stop

Best Documentary Feature
Abacus
Faces Places
Icarus
Last Men in Aleppo
Strong Island

Best Production Design
Beauty and the Beast
Bladerunner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water

Best Cinematography
Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

Best Costume Design
Beauty and The Beast
Darkest Hour
Phantom Thread
The Shape of water
Victoria & Abdul

Best Sound Editing
Baby Driver
Bladerunner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Sound Mixing
Baby Driver
Bladerunner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Animated Short Film
Dear Basketball
Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhymes

RELATED: Standing Ovation For Meryl Streep at the 2018 SAG Awards

Best Original Score
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

RELATED: Oscars 2018 Nominations: Get Out and Lady Bird Score Big

Best Visual Effects
Blade Runner 2049
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

Best Film Editing
Baby Driver
Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Darkest Hour
Victoria & Abdul
Wonder

Best Live Action Short
DeKalb Elementary
The Eleven O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
The Silent Child
Watu Wote/All of Us

The 2018 Oscars were held at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center on March 4 and were telecast live on ABC.

people.com | 3/5/18

Guillermo del Toro’s fishy fantasy romance “The Shape of Water” won Best Picture at Sunday’s 90th annual Academy Awards, and del Toro also won the Best Director prize. (The film also won for score and production design.)

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” picked up two prizes, for lead actress Frances McDormand and supporting actor Sam Rockwell.

Additionally, Gary Oldman won Best Actor playing Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour” and Allison Janey won as the Supporting Actress standout in “I, Tonya.”

And in a night of historic honors, Jordan Peele became the first African American to win the prize for Best Original Screenplay for “Get Out,” while 89-year-old James Ivory became the oldest Oscar winner ever, earning his first statuette for this adapted screenplay for “Call Me by Your Name.”

Also Read: 'The Shape of Water' Dildo: We Just Spoke With the Creator of the Amphibian Man-Inspired Sex Toy

Academy voters spread the wealth among a wide number of features. Christopher Nolan’s WWII drama “Dunkirk” picked up three technical awards, while a number of movies earned two each: “Three Billboards,” “Blade Runner 2049,” “Coco” and “Darkest Hour.”

Check out all of Sunday’s winners and nominees below.

Best Supporting Actor
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” *WINNER

Makeup and Hairstyling
“Darkest Hour” *WINNER

“Victoria and Abdul”
“Wonder”

Costume Design
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Darkest Hour”
“Phantom Thread” *WINNER
“The Shape of Water”
“Victoria and Abdul”

Also Read: Oscars: Guillermo del Toro is Fourth Mexican-Born Best Director in 5 Years

Best Documentary Feature
“Faces Places”
“Icarus” *WINNER
“Last Men in Aleppo”
“Abacus: Small Enough to Jail”
“Strong Island”

Sound Editing
“Baby Driver”
“Blade Runner 2049
“Dunkirk” *WINNER
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Achievement in Sound Mixing
“Baby Driver”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Dunkirk” *WINNER
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Also Read: Jimmy Kimmel's Oscars Jet Ski for Shortest Speech Goes to Costume Designer Mark Bridges

Production Design
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water” *WINNER

Foreign Language
“A Fantastic Woman,” Chile *WINNER
“The Insult,” Lebanon
“Loveless,” Russia
“On Body and Soul,” Hungary
“The Square,” Sweden

Best Supporting Actress
Mary J Blige, “Mudbound”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya” *WINNER
Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Also Read: Oscars: What Is an 'Inclusion Rider,' That Thing Frances McDormand Mentioned in Her Acceptance Speech?

Best Animated Short Film
“Dear Basketball”
*WINNER
“Garden Party”
“Negative Space”
“Lou”
“Revolting Rhymes”

Best Animated Feature Film
“The Boss Baby”
“The Breadwinner”
“Coco” *WINNER
“Ferdinand”
“Loving, Vincent”

Achievement in Visual Effects
“Blade Runner 2049” *WINNER

“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”
“Kong: Skull Island”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“War for the Planet of the Apes”

Also Read: Oscars 'In Memoriam' Omits 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre' Director Tobe Hooper After Using Film in a Montage

Film Editing
“Baby Driver”
“Dunkirk” *WINNER
“I, Tonya”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best Documentary Short Subject
“Edith + Eddie”
“Heroin(e)”
“Knife Skills”
“Traffic Stop”
“Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405” *WINNER

Best Live Action Short
“The Eleven O’Clock”
“My Nephew Emmett”
“The Silent Child” *WINNER
“Watu Wote: All of Us”
“Dekalb Elementary”

Also Read: Tiffany Haddish Follows Through on 'SNL' Monologue, Wears Same White Dress to the Oscars

Best Adaptated Screenplay
“Call Me by Your Name”
*WINNER
“The Disaster Artist”
“Logan”
“Molly’s Game”
“Mudbound”

Best Original Screenplay
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out” *WINNER
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Cinematography
“Blade Runner 2049” *WINNER

“Darkest Hour”
“Mudbound”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”

Also Read: Oscars Disaster Averted? Don't Worry, Envelopes Are Labeled With Huge Font This Year (Photo)

Original Score
“Dunkirk”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Shape of Water” *WINNER
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Original Song
“Mighty River,” “Mudbound”
“Mystery of Love,” “Call Me by Your Name”
“Remember Me,” “Coco” *WINNER
“Stand Up for Something,” “Marshall”
“This Is Me,” “The Greatest Showman”

Best Director
“Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan
“Get Out,” Jordan Peele
“Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
“Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson
“The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro *WINNER

Also Read: So Much for a Glitch-Free Oscars: Academy Sends Out Transcript for Casey Affleck Speech From Last Year

Best Actor
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour” *WINNER
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Best Actress
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” *WINNER
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Best Picture
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water” *WINNER
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Oscars: 'Shape of Water' Wins Big, but #Time'sUp and #MeToo Dominate

Steve Buscemi Shares His (Unsuccessful) Auditions for 'Lady Bird,' 'The Shape of Water,' More (Video)

'The Shape of Water' Director Guillermo del Toro Shares the Secret to Perfect Casting (Exclusive Video)

www.thewrap.com | 3/5/18